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Thread: Long....and level

  1. #1

    Default Long....and level

    I was looking to install my second Drake upstairs and started by looking at the plumbing from the toilet down to the basement. This is what I found. Above this and to the right (maybe 18 inches up) is the toilet. The flush water flows down, left, and then down this long run.

    I'm wondering if there will be a problem carrying the waste water as it will only be 1/3 the water that is being used right now. I currently have a 3.5 gallon toilet and I'm concerned that with little angle on this pipe (it almost looks level), that I may have a back up/clogging problems. Can anyone comment on this?

    By the way, this level run is about 15-18 feet before it angles down into the basement and then to the sewer tank.
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  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    First, measure the drop over the length. If it is 3" pipe, you need 1/4" or more per foot; if it is 4" pipe, you can get by with less, about 1/8" or sol.

    If the pipe has sufficient slope, the lower volume won't hurt anything. In most circumstances, a single flush doesn't move the solids all the way to the street. As water moves by, say from the shower or the next flush, it moves it a little further.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    It should be better then what you have.

    Most 3.5's were pretty slow.

  4. #4

    Default next step

    Ok........thanks for those tips. I've done some further investigation and this is where I'm at.

    I've not taken the toilet off to see what I have. But, I am 99% sure that I will find the same situation I did in the downstairs toilet. The flange was cast iron and was rusted beyond repair. I had to cut the whole thing out from in the basement.

    What are my options here? I have about 1 inch of pipe to use (assuming I cut off the flange. Seems the new flange would be too low.

    Is there an option where the new flange goes inside the pipe?

    I'd like to explore all my options before I take the toilet out as my wife is not too keen on having only one working toilet
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  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You can buy a tool that will drill out the pipe from the socket of the elbow. Then, you can install a new riser and attach the flange to it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6

    Default thanks for the tip

    Does this tool have a specific name?


    Any other options?

  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    There are a couple of different companies that make them, their names elude me at the moment. This comes up often, I probably should remember...try searching on this site (blue bar above).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #8
    Plumbing Designer FloridaOrange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    First, measure the drop over the length. If it is 3" pipe, you need 1/4" or more per foot; if it is 4" pipe, you can get by with less, about 1/8" or sol.

    If the pipe has sufficient slope, the lower volume won't hurt anything. In most circumstances, a single flush doesn't move the solids all the way to the street. As water moves by, say from the shower or the next flush, it moves it a little further.
    Just for future reference Jim, in Florida at least, 3" and above is installed 1/8" pf, anything less is 1/4".
    Matt
    Semi-professional plumbing designer
    Enjoying life in SW Florida

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    One is called Rambit. It has a guide that fits inside the pipe to keep it centered, and a cutter that essentially cuts the pipe out of the fitting. Not very expensive. different ones for each size pipe.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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