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Thread: Silicon in Wire Nuts

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member seaneys's Avatar
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    Default Silicon in Wire Nuts

    Does anyone squirt silicon in wire nuts in damp locations (basements, etc)? I've heard of it, but have never actually done it. Is it worth it for a location that is never intended to get wet?

    Thanks,
    Steve

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by seaneys
    Does anyone squirt silicon in wire nuts in damp locations (basements, etc)? I've heard of it, but have never actually done it. Is it worth it for a location that is never intended to get wet?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Wait, do you mean silicone caulk? I don't know of a specific rule against it, but I would say it is a very bad idea. Wire nuts are flame retardant (don't think silicone is) and you are going to have a hard time actually making a watertight seal. "Damp" is not the same thing as "exposed to wetness" in which case you need to use moistureproof boxes.

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    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    There's pre-caulked wire nuts made for damp locations.

    http://www.smarthome.com/7870.html
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    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seaneys
    Does anyone squirt silicon in wire nuts in damp locations (basements, etc)? I've heard of it, but have never actually done it. Is it worth it for a location that is never intended to get wet?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Silicon can not be used on conductors period!!!!

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    General Contractor, Farmer HandyAndy's Avatar
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    wanting to learn not argue.

    Is there a code for no silicon sealants?

    http://www.spearsmfg.com/prod_brochu...-0597_1004.pdf

    http://www.idealindustries.com/media...d_brochure.pdf
    break down of the above,
    http://www.idealindustries.com/produ...nderground.jsp
    http://www.idealindustries.com/produ...er_db_plus.jsp
    http://www.idealindustries.com/produ...atherproof.jsp

    they all use a "Dielectric Silicon Sealant".

    here is a site that seems to suggest there silicon sealant for electrical use.
    http://www.silchemmarketing.com/silicone_compounds.htm

    here is silicon self fusing tape (apparently similar the old rubber tape that was used with split bolts and such)
    http://www.arlon-std.com/Library/Bro...20Brochure.pdf

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    SILICON is a nonmetallic element that is used in manufacturing electrical components. It is also a common element is compounds such as glasss and sand.

    SILICONE is a class of organic compounds that include the element SILICON.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default wire nuts

    Usually those blue connectors are labled for low voltage only.

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    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    110.11 Deteriorating Agents.
    Unless identified for use in the operating environment, no conductors or equipment shall be located in damp or wet locations; where exposed to gases, fumes, vapors, liquids, or other agents that have a deteriorating effect on the conductors or equipment; or where exposed to excessive temperatures.

    FPN No. 1: See 300.6 for protection against corrosion.

    FPN No. 2: Some cleaning and lubricating compounds can cause severe deterioration of many plastic materials used for insulating and structural applications in equipment.

    Some of the off the shelf silicon agents will damage the insulation of some types of conductors.

    If silicon is going to be used on electrical conductors or equipment it needs to be listed and labeled for the prupose.

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    General Contractor, Farmer HandyAndy's Avatar
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    Thank you for the information and I apologize for my misspelling of Silicone

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    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    I wasn't criticizing the spelling.

    Lot's of people confuse silicon and silicone.

    It's like concrete and cement. Many people look at concrete and call it cement.

    Cement + aggregate + water --> concrete.

    Silicon + various other elements --> Silicones

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    Electrical Contractor/Instructor jwelectric's Avatar
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    Look at my posts

    I left the E off on purpose

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by seaneys
    Does anyone squirt silicon in wire nuts in damp locations (basements, etc)? I've heard of it, but have never actually done it. Is it worth it for a location that is never intended to get wet?

    Thanks,
    Steve
    Okay, I bet you are referring to silicone grease. This stuff is okay to use and is often found in automobile wire harness connectors, where moisture is a problem. I was thinking bathtub caulk heheh

  13. #13
    Rancher
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    We used Silicone in manufacturing back in the 70's to keep CRT monitors in the computer industry from arcing from the high voltage section to the outside case. It was GE's RTV stuff. However that said I wouldn't add any thing to a wire nut, it either should be in a dry enough location not to need anything else or it should have the proper weather proof enclosure to protect the connection.

    Rancher

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    DIY Senior Member seaneys's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot for the clarification. I thought something seemed 'strange' when I noticed this in more than one trusted reference. I held off since it seemed overkill. Our basement is humid, but not THAT humid that I would call it damp.

    Steve

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    DIY Senior Member Livin4Real's Avatar
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    May have been mentioned but if your worried about it you can use dielectric grease on the nuts (wire of course, not your own, unless your into that )
    Also referred to as marine grease (what they use on lights on boat trailers, etc.) And if your basement is that damp you should have a dehumidifier.

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