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Thread: Installing a fiberglass tub

  1. #1

    Default Installing a fiberglass tub

    I am in the process of remodeling my bathroom. I am installing a 60 inch fiberglass tub(no shower) and I would like to know if it is necessary to surround the tub with tile. I planned on installing green board to within a quarter inch, filling the gap with caulk to prevent wicking, and then painting. I have never seen a tub with no tile around it, but this is what I would like to do. Is this ok?

    Thanks,

    Eric

  2. #2

    Default

    As long as you prevent wicking, prime, use a good quality semi-gloss or gloss paint, this should work. I would also wipe down the wall after each bath to prevent mold growth.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Another thing to keep in mind...some consider it optional, but you'll really like the installation better if you put some deck mud under the tub to support the bottom fully. It will also minimize flex cracks and make the tub last longer and look better. I find it makes a big difference in the perceived quality - you can feel the (small) flex of a typical tub when you get in and out.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default surround

    You have never seen it done for a good reason. Even with a good paint it is going to deteriorate rather quickly.

  5. #5
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Default

    If the tub is really just a tub ( no shower or hand held spray ) this is ok and properly maintained will be OK. Have you considered putting a spalsh around the tub? This could be 2 to 4 rows of 4" tiles or one or 2 rows of 6" tiles. Adds a nice decorative touch and is very functional as well.

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member ehlinn's Avatar
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    Default this is ericlinn

    I could no longer post with my old account so I had to open a new one. Thanks for the tips guys.

  7. #7
    DIY Junior Member ehlinn's Avatar
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    Default cement backer board

    I have another question. I am going to start putting my bathroom back together in the next couple of days. I have gutted the entire thing. I have noticed that most bathtubs and showers(my old ones included) sit directly on the plywood subfloor. Then cement backer board and tile is butted up to them.

    Would it be ok to cover the entire floor with the cement backer board first, and then install the tub and shower on top of the cement board? Seems like this would be better just in case a little bit of water seeped through where the tile floor and fiberglass tub meet. Thanks for any help.

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