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Thread: Non Standard Vacuum Breaker

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  1. #1

    Default Non Standard Vacuum Breaker

    I have a outdoor spigot that has a vacuum breaker on it. I bought hte house 3 years ago and it was built 7 years ago. It appears the vacuum breaker on the spigot has gone bad. Water is spraying out of the middle portion of it and there seems to be no way to get in to the attachment to fix or replace the seal so I unscrewed it and took it to the local Lowes and Home Depot to look for a replacement. After searching there and a few local hardware stores it seems I have some wierd non standard spigot/vacuum breaker. The spigot side of the vacuum breaker seems to be 1" (or close to it) but the threads that screw on to the spigot are fine and close together. Not the standard pipe size threads. Of course no one seems to have these and I have no idea where to look for the replacement. I did some searching on the web and all the ones I have found online seem to have the standard pipe threads on the spigot side. So does anyone know what make/model spigot I have been cursed with? I am even willing to just get an adapter (non vacuum breaker attachment) just so I can hook my hose back up and use it. However, the non standard threads on the spigot seem to be messing that up too.
    Last edited by Kub; 07-05-2006 at 05:46 AM.

  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default vb

    If the vacuum breaker is part of the faucet, and not just screwed on and locked in place, then the only repair for it is another vb from the same manufacturer, and possibly the same model hose faucet. Normally the best repair for your problem is to replace the entire hose faucet and vb.

  3. #3

    Default

    It is a unscrewable attachment about 2.5 inches long. two chambers and the hose connector. It is just the end that screws on to the spigot is close to 1 inch in diameter and has a much finer thread that what seems to be the standard.

  4. #4
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default backflow

    Take it off and replace it. If it's what I think it is, there is a steel set screw on the side to keep you from removing it , You can take it off with two channel locks. Use one pair to hold back with. It will scar the threads but won't make it inoperable. As I said, replace it.

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by plumber1
    Take it off and replace it. If it's what I think it is, there is a steel set screw on the side to keep you from removing it , You can take it off with two channel locks. Use one pair to hold back with. It will scar the threads but won't make it inoperable. As I said, replace it.

    I think ya missed it above where I said I unscrewed it and took it to local hardware stores with no luck finding a replacement that fit. I was hoping to find someplace I can find a replacement since none of the local places seem to sell it. There is no set screw on it, although when I was looking for replacements I did see ones on the replacements that didn't fit.
    Attached is what mine looks like. The local ones seem to have a white/clear plactic washer and a third metal ring on the end that screws on to the spigot. It's the third ring that has the set screw in it. However the replacement I need it like the drawing below.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by Kub; 07-05-2006 at 08:14 AM.

  6. #6
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default v/b

    No, there some sill cocks that have an integral v/b and you can unscrew the cap to get at it and there is a replacement for it. The kind your talking about should be available at hardware stores and any good plumber should have one or two on hand.

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    DIY Junior Member violet2christi's Avatar
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    Default

    I know it's been awhile since you've had this problem with a replacement for a leaking vacuum breaker, but what did you end up doing? I have exactly the same faucet (as the one shown in the pic you posted) and the vacuum breaker shown above. Thanks.

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member mdietz39's Avatar
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    Default Replace freezeless adapter on outdoor faucet

    We have outdoor faucets which do not have a garden hose thread. They require an adapter to attach a hose. The only adapter we have locally are a freezeless type which starts to leak after a year or two. Is there an adapter which is just solid, without all the stuff to drain the line etc., to adapt the faucet to take a garden hose?

    Thank you for your time and attention to this.
    Mike

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Buy better quality hose bibs! Those are frost-free hose bibs, and they require the vacuum breaker to work, unless I'm all wet. Maybe a picture of what you have would help clarify the situation, but no, don't think there's another way. A frost-free hose bib does three things: has a built-in vacuum breaker to prevent accidentially sucking in contaminated water and polluting your water supply, automatically drains to prevent the pipe from bursting (only works on most if you remember to remove the hose when it freezes - this may be why it fails so often), and last, turns the water on and off. Some are built better than others, but if over the winter, you leave the hose on, unless you buy a whole new faucet that won't be damaged, you HAVE to remove the hose when it freezes, or things will break.
    Jim DeBruycker
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    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10
    Plumbing Contractor for 49 years johnjh2o1's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    Buy better quality hose bibs! Those are frost-free hose bibs, and they require the vacuum breaker to work, unless I'm all wet. Maybe a picture of what you have would help clarify the situation, but no, don't think there's another way. A frost-free hose bib does three things: has a built-in vacuum breaker to prevent accidentially sucking in contaminated water and polluting your water supply, automatically drains to prevent the pipe from bursting (only works on most if you remember to remove the hose when it freezes - this may be why it fails so often), and last, turns the water on and off. Some are built better than others, but if over the winter, you leave the hose on, unless you buy a whole new faucet that won't be damaged, you HAVE to remove the hose when it freezes, or things will break.
    I think what you are referring to is you have standard hose bibs with a vacuum breaker attached. The vacuum breaker is there for all the reasons jadnashua gave.

    John



    Last edited by Terry; 08-15-2011 at 08:55 AM.

  11. #11
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    ABQ does freeze on occasion...the vacuum breaker is the weak point, and is the first thing to go if there's a hose on the bib and it does freeze.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  12. #12
    DIY Junior Member mdietz39's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    ABQ does freeze on occasion...the vacuum breaker is the weak point, and is the first thing to go if there's a hose on the bib and it does freeze.
    Yes it does freeze here, we actually live in the mountains outside of Albuquerque. -28 degrees this winter but that set all kinds of records. Normally it will get down to about 10 degrees above zero, maybe. However another of these pieces of junk just started leaking today. It has been above 65 degrees every day for months, hitting up to 101 during the day. So it did not freeze. They just fail. I turn the water on and there is a leak above the hose in the recess of the adapter. I think the internal working eventually fails.

    As far as replacing the bib, that will cost around $250 each and we have five of them. Plus it means cutting into the interior wall with all the patching needed for four of them, one of which requires removing the kitchen sink and cabinet to get to the pipe. BUMMER.

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