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Thread: Getting a new fridge with a larger width - water supply 7 Ft away

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    DIY Junior Member Sam Shahroom's Avatar
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    Default Getting a new fridge with a larger width - water supply 7 Ft away

    Hi All - I am planning to get a new fridge and most of the ones i have seen are atleast 35-3/4" wide. The problem is that the fridge i have is between the 2 counter tops and the max width there is 36". I have another area where i can fit the fridge but the water outlet would be at least 7-8 ft from this new space. Are there that long connectors available for the refrigerator ? If yes is it safe to have the water outlet that far away from the fridge (One of the ladies i spoke to at Home Depot said that their team wont install the fridge if the water supply is 4ft away from the fridge.

    Please advise.

    Thanks
    Sam

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    DIY Member Stuff's Avatar
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    Installers won't hook anything up that isn't in the space the appliance is going. There are several ways to extend the water supply but it needs to be run through cabinets, under floor, etc. Plan on hiring a plumber.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    If the new fridge is 35 3/4" and the space is 36", which is a common and normal situation, what is the problem? With a piece of 1/4' copper, you can put the fridge anywhere you want to.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    That does sound rather strange.

    Counting the door hinge swing it would be wider, But the unit should not be pushed back that far.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    DIY Junior Member Sam Shahroom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    If the new fridge is 35 3/4" and the space is 36", which is a common and normal situation, what is the problem? With a piece of 1/4' copper, you can put the fridge anywhere you want to.
    The measurement could be 1/4 less or more..Not sure what you mean by 'With a piece of 1/4' copper, you can put the fridge anywhere you want to'.

    Thanks
    Sam

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    DIY Junior Member Sam Shahroom's Avatar
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    What type of hose/extension would i need..Could you please send me a home depot or Lowes link which shows me exactly what type would i need to get and if its available in 7 Ft length.

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Shahroom View Post
    What type of hose/extension would i need..Could you please send me a home depot or Lowes link which shows me exactly what type would i need to get and if its available in 7 Ft length.

    http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?...llow&cId=PDIO1

    And the correct fittings.

    It is best to coil the extra behind the fridge so that you can pull it out.


    Good Luck
    Last edited by DonL; 10-02-2013 at 08:19 AM.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    DIY Member WorthFlorida's Avatar
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    Many new homes the soft 1/4 copper pipe is going away at least behind the refrigerator and you do not have to worry about crimping the copper when you have to move the big box for service or cleaning. Go to Lowes.com and search "hoses for ice maker" and you'll see a long list. This is the type I used in my home and where I work though shorter lengths. Here is a picture for a 20'. You may need to change the fitting on the copper line to adapter to this hose. There are many brands of SS hose, it doesn't have to be this one. If you do use this type, do run several gallons of water through it before connecting it to the refig. Once connected do run more water if you have a cold water tap on the door and discard the first two batches of ice.

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    Last edited by WorthFlorida; 10-02-2013 at 06:06 PM.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I agree with Worth Florida. Problem with copper tubing is it can kink and/or pull loose from the connections when you pull the fridge out to clean. The flex tubing works much better.

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    I agree with Worth Florida. Problem with copper tubing is it can kink and/or pull loose from the connections when you pull the fridge out to clean.

    That may be true if it is not installed properly.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Most refrigerators have the hinges set so they do not require additional space and fit into the "exact size" opening, because cabinet makers make the openings "exact size".
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Most refrigerators have the hinges set so they do not require additional space and fit into the "exact size" opening, because cabinet makers make the openings "exact size".

    I guess that is true for most of the new stuff.

    What are some of the exact sizes used today ?


    Some are not made to be built in, because ventilation is important for good refrigeration.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    DIY Member ImOld's Avatar
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    I inadvertently replied in the wrong thread last night.

    Just a word of caution.

    As I said, there is no way I would buy a refrigerator relying on the width dimension being within one quarter of an inch.

    New refrigerators can have a width mid-point bulge that easily excedes this dimension.

  14. #14
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote; New refrigerators can have a width mid-point bulge that easily excedes this dimension.

    If the refrigerator says it is 36" wide and it has a "bulge" so it does not fit, then call the seller and have him give you one that does NOT bulge. Kitchen installers ALWAYS make the openings standard sizes for dishwashers, refrigerators, and ranges, i.e., if there is a 36" cabinet above the reefer, which is usually the case, then the opening IS going to be EXACTLY 36"..
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    quote; New refrigerators can have a width mid-point bulge that easily excedes this dimension.

    If the refrigerator says it is 36" wide and it has a "bulge" so it does not fit, then call the seller and have him give you one that does NOT bulge. Kitchen installers ALWAYS make the openings standard sizes for dishwashers, refrigerators, and ranges, i.e., if there is a 36" cabinet above the reefer, which is usually the case, then the opening IS going to be EXACTLY 36"..
    lol.


    They staked it to high, if it is bulging.


    The strange thing that gets me is, A electrical appliance needs to have a minimum clearance.

    Most of the built in ones do not meet code, when the insurance adjuster come knocking.


    Have Fun Everyone.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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