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Thread: Getting rid of H2S

  1. #1
    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    Default Getting rid of H2S

    Fairly common well problem...H2S...rotten egg smell......

    What is the best treatment? Tested at 1-2 ppm.

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    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    There are many treatment methods. Common methods are as simple as a catlytic GAC or a KDF 85 backwashing filter, to chlorine injection / contact tank / GAC, or manganese dioxide ore media backwashing systems, simple aeration, etc. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages and each person who does water treatment will have their preferred method. I lean toward the manganese dioxide based medias mainly because they work almost every time, are extremely simple, and they also clarify the water, remove iron, and manganese. They have a disadvantage in that they need excessive backwash flow rates, and are slightly expensive. KDF85 also works very similarly to Mag Ox medias, but is even more expensive. Catalytic carbon works fairly well, it works great when combined with an oxidizing agent and a contact tank. What other water issues are there? What kind of equipment is alrewady installed? Do they have an atmospheric storage tank? Many factors will come into play to determine the "best" treatment method.

    Hope this helps,

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    DIY Junior Member njbasecamp's Avatar
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    @dittohead

    How would one go about sting up a Non-Backwash KDF-85 Tank. I see a few of these on the market and I like the idea of not pumping everything up hill to my septic or yard from my basement. I see things like the Rhino whole house filter that uses KDF-85 and gets ~300,000 gal life with an ok 7GPM flow rate. I dont need all the stuff that come with a system like this as I already have a GAC tank with BB20 pre and post filters. I just want to buy a non-backwash up-flow tank with KDF-85 get about 7-12gpm.

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    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    A simple KDF 85 upflow tank works fairly well and is very popular in a few other industries, outside of the potable water market. A simple in/out tank w/ bypass, a heavy underbed, and some KDF85 is all that would beneeded. I have a KDF tank on myown house, it is KDF55 since it is more for municipal that well water. it is a downflow with backwash, but upflow can work well. My only concern with KDF in an upflow configuration is that it gets a good flow on occassion. An 8" tank should get a 10 GPM flow for a few minutes every few weeks to be sure it is moved around adequately to give it a good, long life. I can hook you up with a company that sells these, just send me an IM if you are unable to locate one.

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    In the Trades Texas Wellman's Avatar
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    Explain some of the acronyms for us treatment challenged people please? KDF = ???

    I have used the catalytic carbon with air oxidation with fair to good results.

    I don't have a specific case, just in general.

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    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    Explain some of the acronyms for us treatment challenged people please? KDF = ???

    I have used the catalytic carbon with air oxidation with fair to good results.

    I don't have a specific case, just in general.
    KDF is the name of a media. It is copper and zinc in different proportions. KDF85 is primarily used for well applications and is effective at iron and hydrogen sulfide removal when applied correctly. It is also very effective at chloramine reduction (not a concern on a well(, heavy metals removel like lead and mercury, and a host ot other contaminants. http://www.kdfft.com/ Since it is manufactured out of pure copper and zinc, the price fluctuates with the market price of those metals. As you might have guessed, the price has nearly tripled in the past 5 years. KDF will react with hydrogen sulfide and form insoluble copper sulfide. This copper sulfide is simply backwashed off the kdf85 media. It will also remove up to 98% mercury, lead, nickel, copper, chromium, and other dissolved metals. Check out their website for details, this is a highly effective media. It also has a bad reputation, but that is primarily due to its misuse or improper application. It must be aggressively backwashed regularly. In my own house, I have a large KDF tank filtering all of my water, it only backwashes every 15-20 days, and no problems for over ten years.

  7. #7

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    Kinetic Degradation Fluxion.

    Dittohead, you have obviously had better luck than I have with KDF. Yes, it has its place in water treatment but my attempts to apply it to H2S ahve not turned out very well. With any backwashing device, an incredible high rate of backwash flow rate is required according to tank diameter. Without consistently and frequently lifting the bed, solidification and thus channeling occurs greatly shortening the life of the media. Media replacement becomes expensive and frustrating.

    An upflow tank will almost never get the flow rate required to move the bed around unless it is placed in front of the pressure tank with flow restrictor to regulate precise flow rate.

    My all-time favorite use for KDF is in smaller refillable cartridges placed ahead of ROs where a whole house sulfur system is foregone, unavailable or price prohibitive. A small test valve is placed following the filter to determine media life. here flow rate and channeling is not an issue.

    KDF is also used in shower filters as it is not affected by higher temps as carbon is. It could even be placed after a water heater.

    How wide is your tank and what valve do you have on it?

  8. #8
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Texas Wellman View Post
    Fairly common well problem...H2S...rotten egg smell......

    What is the best treatment? Tested at 1-2 ppm.

    I have found that the best way to get rid of H2S is to get rid of H2O.

    That is not the best solution in many cases tho.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    I have had success with KDF but backwash flow rate is high and typically water treatment equipment is applied to well systems so the pumps output is a factor. Before going with KDF it is important to make sure the well pump has enough ooomph (technical term because we have been accused of being too scientific here and confusing the posters LOL) to backwash the bed properly.
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

  10. #10
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=water solutions;343634]Kinetic Degradation Fluxion.

    Dittohead, you have obviously had better luck than I have with KDF. Yes, it has its place in water treatment but my attempts to apply it to H2S ahve not turned out very well. With any backwashing device, an incredible high rate of backwash flow rate is required according to tank diameter. Without consistently and frequently lifting the bed, solidification and thus channeling occurs greatly shortening the life of the media. Media replacement becomes expensive and frustrating.

    An upflow tank will almost never get the flow rate required to move the bed around unless it is placed in front of the pressure tank with flow restrictor to regulate precise flow rate.

    My all-time favorite use for KDF is in smaller refillable cartridges placed ahead of ROs where a whole house sulfur system is foregone, unavailable or price prohibitive. A small test valve is placed following the filter to determine media life. here flow rate and channeling is not an issue.

    KDF is also used in shower filters as it is not affected by higher temps as carbon is. It could even be placed after a water heater.

    How wide is your tank and what valve do you have on it?[/QUOT

    I agree that KDF is a difficult media to get to work right, and it has a bad reputation, but... I have had great success with it. It requires a backwash rate of 30 GPM per square foot of bed area, even higher rates when the water is warm. A 7" diameter tank requires a 7-8 GPM backwash rate. It should be done no less than every few days if the media is being hit with iron, manganese, or hydrogen sulfide. It will turn into a cement block if this is not done. In my application, I have a 7x13 tank that is backwashing every 15-20 days, but it is municipal water that is very clean. I can also get over 15 gpM flow rate through it and still acheive 95% chlorine removal. KDF is similar to pyrolox, it is an amazing media, but if it is applied improperly, it will not work , and it will not last.

    We make kdf/gac filters, we even have the KDF manufactured into foam pads for pre-treating GAC filters, they work great and have a huge chlorine and heavy metals capacity.

    We have even had good luck with the Canpro Media guards, backwash rate is the key.

    BTW, i have a 7000XTR quad system, more prototype than functional. Check out this link to see my system. Note: the system has been changed a bit, more gauges, controls, etc but the basic function is still the same. http://www.terrylove.com/forums/show...ight=prototype

    Tank number 3, the smallest tank is the KDF55 tank.

  11. #11
    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Sawyer View Post
    I have had success with KDF but backwash flow rate is high and typically water treatment equipment is applied to well systems so the pumps output is a factor. Before going with KDF it is important to make sure the well pump has enough ooomph (technical term because we have been accused of being too scientific here and confusing the posters LOL) to backwash the bed properly.
    ooomph is still a bit technical, can you put that in laymans terms please?

  12. #12
    In the Trades Tom Sawyer's Avatar
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    Ok then the Tim Taylor solution "more power"
    [B]No, plumbing ain't rocket science. Unlike rocket science, plumbing requires a license[B]

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    DIY Junior Member njbasecamp's Avatar
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    @Dittohead,

    Hey I have finally gotten back to this project. I need to get the H2S out of my system when I travel a few days i come home to water that stinks :-). I am getting concerned after following up with this thread that my up flow idea is a bad one. I am fine with paying the premium and using the upflow and replacing the media every 1-3years. but i am concerned that ill go away for a few days and come home to a brick of KDF the weak after i put it in. I am thinking I might just put in 2 bb20 in parallel and use KDF cartage style filters I could get 5gpm out of that. it's still a premium cost wise even a bit more then the upflow tank but maybe less work and more manageable. I am thinking i might be stuck in the design faze forever any help moving this along would be great.

  14. #14
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Is your odor in the hot water, cold water or both?

    If the odor gets stronger after no water use for a few days, that says you have a bacteria problem.
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    Water systems designer, R&D ditttohead's Avatar
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    Dual BB is a last ditch alternative. I am not a fan of this design for a lot of reason, too many to go into here, but I sell a lot of this design. From a technical standpoint, it has many flaws.
    Gary said it perfectly, if the odor is consistent, it is easily treatable by conventional means. If it is intermittent, you may have bigger issues. I would start with a few quick tests. Be sure to test for odors in the hot water vs. the cold water. A lot of "rotten egg smell" can come from the water heater. Check that first and let us know what you come up with.

    Sorry for the delay in responding, I was in Florida all week on business. BTW, the weather sucks there.

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