(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Bryant Evolution Question

  1. #1
    DIY Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mexico and Canada
    Posts
    42

    Default Bryant Evolution Question

    Our new Bryant is supposed to be a "smart" furnace. After 2 weeks here the furnace ran for about 8 hours and the AC for one hour it is telling me the filter is 65 % used!!! How is that possible. How does it determine this: by back pressure or by time?

    Thanks

    Moisheh

  2. #2
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Diego
    Posts
    9,001

    Default

    You should check you manual to see if the filter signal is just a timer. If it is, the T'stat may not have been set to "zero" at start up. A quick glance at the filter should reveal if it is 65% dirty!

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,434

    Default

    A dust storm off the desert could easily use up a filter as could a big burden of pollen, especially if the doors and windows are open part of the day.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    DIY Member Lightwave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    98

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moisheh View Post
    Our new Bryant is supposed to be a "smart" furnace. After 2 weeks here the furnace ran for about 8 hours and the AC for one hour it is telling me the filter is 65 % used!!! How is that possible. How does it determine this: by back pressure or by time?
    If your thermostat is programmed to expect a media filter, the Evolution will try to detect filter state by comparing the current external static pressure (ESP) on the blower with ESP measurements taken when the system was installed. In my experience, filter detection on the Evolution is useless.

    If your thermostat is programmed to expect an electronic air filter, filter cleaning reminders are based only on a timer.

  5. #5
    DIY Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mexico and Canada
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Thanks Lightwave: I am using the good 3M filters and I know they do not last as long as the 99 cent junkers. However when I examine the filters they are fine. Bryant slipped up on this one.

    Moisheh

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    21,434

    Default

    Depending on how fine of particles the filter is designed to trap, a visual inspection won't tell you all that much. Once you have a lot of visually observable crud, the filter is long past changing. How much of a restriction the fan and heat exchangers can take depends on the design. For example, it might be designed to only allow a maximum of 15% reduction with the filter. A new filter might be 10% out of the box (verses no filter), and you might not be able to see an accumulation of crud on the filter until it dropped to 40%, but by design, you'd been overstressing the system for quite awhile. While few people change their filters every month, that is the interval some suggest. What you're seeing may be normal. Now, most people don't replace their filter that often and their systems don't die, but they may not be working as efficiently as they could for much of their lives.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7
    DIY Member Lightwave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    98

    Default

    I believe the Evolution filter sensing system was specifically designed for Bryant/Carrier's 3.5" media filter and EAC units. It probably won't give meaningful results when confronted with standard 1" filters.

    Evolution furnaces have variable speed blowers which operate in constant CFM mode. Dirty filters won't disturb an Evolution as much as they would disturb a traditional system. Provided your ductwork isn't extremely restrictive, a dirty filter will just cause the blower to ramp up to maintain the correct airflow through the heat exchanger and AC coil.

    The Evolution thermostat can report system static pressure if you want to keep an eye on the airflow health of your system.

    Replacing the filter every two months is probably good enough.

  8. #8
    DIY Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mexico and Canada
    Posts
    42

    Default

    Thanks for the replies

    Moisheh

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member Rat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Bertram, Texas
    Posts
    12

    Default

    The problem is the #M filter, they are very restrictive to begin with. What the Evol sees is, even with a new #M filter, a high ESP; then the filter loads just a small amount, and it sends the filter dirty signal. Get rid of the 3M filter and get a good MERV 11-13 Camfil or equivalent and you will be back to your regularly scheduled filter changes.

    In my testing the 3M micro-pleat filter had twice the pressure drop of the Camfil micro-pleat filters.
    There's nothing magical about it; it's all science, physics and math.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •