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Thread: New House, Shared Well, Iron and H2S

  1. #1
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    Default New House, Shared Well, Iron and H2S

    Been reading through many of the posts out here trying to identify what treatment I need for our new house.

    Specifics (from the well company):
    - Shared Well drilled in 2003, 5 houses, approx 20GPM in 1" pipe to house from tap on lot
    - Well is 860ft deep, 5hp pump, 2 40gal pressure tanks, 2" pipe from well to tap on lot
    - biggest issue is H2S smell
    - Iron is 2-5ppm
    - hardness is 20grain
    - No bacteria or nitrates
    - Most people on the well are using an Iron Curtian to remove the H2S and Iron followed with as softener

    What I am looking for is a good way to address the H2S and Iron (and softening if convienient). I am not sold on the Iron Filter since of the 8 people in the neighborhood I have talked to with them (there are 5 shared wells, all same depth) 7 have had to replace parts on them, or had issues from poor performance, to flooded basements.

    So what are my other options? sounds like a softener may be able to take care of the iron and the hardness, but does not sound like it can handle the H2S (or maybe I missread something).

    Any help would be great, and Gary, if you have a system that could work, you are on my short list for water treatment equipment supply.

    Thanks!
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

  2. #2
    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    How long new is the well?
    Has the pump in the well be run for 48 hours at 5 gpm?

  3. #3
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    The Well was drilled in 2003, less than 7 years old.

    The measurements are made annually by the well company as part of the service agreement with the subdivision. If I understand what you are asking, then yes there had been significant flow in the previous 48hrs.

    thanks.
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

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    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    Not signifacant, continuis flow.
    5-7gpm for 48 hours straight.

    If the well was drilled and then sat for awhile and has not been used it will change the water test.

    The well needs to do what is turn over, pulling water out and that will have New water come into the well.

  5. #5
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    Well has been in use for several years by the other 3 houses on it. Not sure what you are expecting from this type of test. The annual testing has shown that these values are not varying.

    Thanks.
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

  6. #6
    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    Ok, Some times with new wells the values are different from what one might get after useage.
    Well Drillers in my area always like to have the well used for a few months (hard) before making the choice as to what kind of equipment to use to clean up the water for inside the house.

  7. #7
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Twinpeaksr View Post
    Specifics (from the well company):
    - Shared Well drilled in 2003, 5 houses, approx 20GPM in 1" pipe to house from tap on lot
    - Well is 860ft deep, 5hp pump, 2 40gal pressure tanks, 2" pipe from well to tap on lot
    - biggest issue is H2S smell
    - Iron is 2-5ppm
    - hardness is 20grain
    - No bacteria or nitrates
    - Most people on the well are using an Iron Curtian to remove the H2S and Iron followed with as softener

    What I am looking for is a good way to address the H2S and Iron (and softening if convienient).

    So what are my other options? sounds like a softener may be able to take care of the iron and the hardness, but does not sound like it can handle the H2S (or maybe I missread something).

    Any help would be great, and Gary, if you have a system that could work, you are on my short list for water treatment equipment supply.
    I have treated up to 13 ppm of iron with a 'special' softener and up to 5 ppm of iron with a regular softener IF the person will do a quick maintenance thing once a month forever but... you have H2S and no softener will remove it so...

    I suggest my inline erosion pellet chlorinator and equivalent 120 gal retention tank followed by a carbon filter with a special carbon. That gets rid of the H2S and all types of bacteria, including all types of reducing bacteria, and means the softener does not have to deal with the iron or H2S.
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
    Click Here to learn how to correctly size or program a water softener.
    CAUTION, as of Nov 12 2013 all YouTube videos showing how to rebuild a Clack valve have an error in them that can cause damage.

  8. #8
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    So if I understand your recommendation:

    - Chlorinator
    - Carbon Filter
    - Softener

    Is this the only solution or are their other options?

    Sounds like the Chlorinator removes the H2S, is the Carbon Filter removing the Iron? A little unclear on what each step in the system is doing. The softener is obviously doing the hardness.

    I see maintainance as:

    - Chlorine Addition
    - Filter Change
    - Softener Salt

    What info do you need to identify maintainace timing and use (IE Filter every 3mo, 5lbs chlorine every 4mo, etc...) Just trying to get an idea on maintaince cost and installation cost (we can take this offline if better).

    Thanks!
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

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    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
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    Another option would be to use a filox media to remove both the H2S and the iron followed by a softener.

    You would need to check the ORP (oxidation reduction potential) of your water and if it is not adequate would need to add an oxidizing feed prior to the filox. Either chlorine or hydrogen peroxide can be used if the addition of an oxidizer is required. The Filox will remove low levels of chlorine so that a carbon filter may not be necessary with this set up.

    Here is a link to a description of Filox:

    http://www.epsonline.ie/shop/uploads...0filox%20r.pdf

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    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    What kind of flow rate is needed for the house and another point of use?


    What is the gpm of the well pump to the house?

    There is another media that might work, but gpm would be the make or brake.

  11. #11
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akpsdvan View Post
    What kind of flow rate is needed for the house and another point of use?


    What is the gpm of the well pump to the house?

    There is another media that might work, but gpm would be the make or brake.
    The Flow rate to the first treatment piece (from the pump) is estimated to be 20GPM by the well company based on me using a 1" pipe. Not sure my flow rate needs for the house (I know that depends on fixtures and many other things), but it will be a 4 bedroom 2.5bath with a whirlpool tub in one of the full baths. future expansion will include 2 additional bedrooms and 1 more full bathroom.

    Thanks!
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

  12. #12
    In the Trades Akpsdvan's Avatar
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    Manganese Greensand Filter, 2.0 cubic foot unit for iron and smell followed with a Softener for the Hardness that is in the water.
    The 2.0 Greensand filter could handle 10gpm flow rate, if more flow rate is needed through the greensand, double up on it, two filters first in last out.
    Softener could be sized for 10gpm with a peak of 15gpm which would be at least 1.5 cubic foot.


    That is one of the ways that I might handle this kind of water here.

  13. #13
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    Sounds like I have 3 possible solutions:

    Solution G:
    - Chlorinator (H2S and Fe)
    - Carbon Filter (Cl)
    - Softener (Hardness)

    Solution B:
    - Iron Media Filter (H2S and Fe)
    - Softener (Hardness)

    Solution A:
    - Manganese Greensand Filter (H2S and Fe)
    - Softener (Hardness)

    Any thoughts on Pros/Cons for these Systems? I am guessing they all will do the job. What I have So Far:

    Solution G:
    Pro: Reduction in Water usage since no Iron Filter Backwash needed
    Con: Need to replace a Filter, Cl, and NaCl regularly

    Solution B:
    Pro: Only Need NaCl Regularly
    Con: Can take a lot of water to backwash the media (1200gal/3 days based on others experience)

    Solution A:
    Same as Solution B I think.


    Any other info on this? Thanks for the help so far!

    ~R~
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

  14. #14
    DIY Senior Member Bob999's Avatar
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    I think the carbon filter Gary is recommending is a backwashing filter. You would need to ask him about the backwash requirements. It obviously depends on the size of the filter among other things. Also Carbon filters need to be re-bedded periodically.

    I think the backwash requirements for a Filox filter are a bit less than your estimate. A 2 cubic foot unit with a Vortech tank requires 10 gallon per minute backwash with daily backwash required. If the backwash is 8 minutes and settling rinse is 4 minutes that is 120 gallons per day.

    Manganese greensand (or Manganese Greensand Plus which has some advantages as compared to traditional Greensand) would typically be regenerated with potassium permanganate which is a poison and really messy. Not something I would chose if there are alternatives.

  15. #15
    Engineer Twinpeaksr's Avatar
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    I think the carbon filter Gary is recommending is a backwashing filter. You would need to ask him about the backwash requirements. It obviously depends on the size of the filter among other things. Also Carbon filters need to be re-bedded periodically.

    I think the backwash requirements for a Filox filter are a bit less than your estimate. A 2 cubic foot unit with a Vortech tank requires 10 gallon per minute backwash with daily backwash required. If the backwash is 8 minutes and settling rinse is 4 minutes that is 120 gallons per day.

    Manganese greensand (or Manganese Greensand Plus which has some advantages as compared to traditional Greensand) would typically be regenerated with potassium permanganate which is a poison and really messy. Not something I would chose if there are alternatives.
    Thanks for the update, good to get clarification. If the Greensand uses KMnO4 I think that one is out, I have worked with that before, with the right second ingreediant it can make a good size bang, also can combust pretty easily.

    I think I need more information on the Carbon Filter, soulds like it is not what I thought. I think I am down to Solution B or Solution G.

    Thanks!
    "Now Grab a Brick or go to Hell." - H. Simpson

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