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Thread: Well pit cover ideas

  1. #1

    Question Well pit cover ideas

    We just had a new jet pump installed in the basement and a new foot switch installed in the well. The problem we face now is finding a suitable well pit cover. The old one, a 3'x3' square of concrete that is about 3 or 4 inches thick, had to be removed with a neighbors backhoe and we'd like to find something lighter and more easily removed, if possible, to replace it with. Looking for something inexpensive as well. Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    I think your choices are wood or steel that will rust and rot so put the concrete back unless you don't mind the thought that nothing else will last for decades without caving in as you walk or drive something on it.

    Or extend the casing up out of the pit and backfill the pit.
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    Radon Contractor and Water Treatment 99k's Avatar
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    It really is a good practice to extend the wellhead a minimum of 6" above grade to prevent contamination ... that is code in our area.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Slusser View Post
    I think your choices are wood or steel that will rust and rot so put the concrete back unless you don't mind the thought that nothing else will last for decades without caving in as you walk or drive something on it.

    Or extend the casing up out of the pit and backfill the pit.
    The pit is in a flower bed up against the foundation of the house at a corner [where garage connects to house] getting the slab off was difficult enough, because of the weight and small work area. No one, including the plumber, felt the slab could be put back over the pit. The plumber suggested we go to a metal's shop and ask to have a piece of metal cut to size.....can't recall what he suggested, but it began with "aluminum" Any idea what he may have been talking about. I was under the impression that it was something sturdy that would support weight and would not rust. I don't mean to be a bother, but my husband and I were raised in the city, we are not familiar with wells and all that goes along with them. Thanks.

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