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Thread: Floor drain in bathroom.

  1. #1
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
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    Default Floor drain in bathroom.

    I am having a contractor rebuild my kitchen and bath. The Floor is going to be compleatly removed and so is the pluming. We have a 1 piece shower unit already bought. We were also thinking that a floor drain would be a good idea. I asked the contractor and he has not seen a floor drain in any thing other than tile/cment floor. Any ideas if this can be done on wood floor with vinal? If so what prep and how to seal the drain to the floor. We also like the idea of vinal tile, we have the better grade 12" stick on tile in the laundry and love the look and feel. Any thoughts on this combo witht a floor drain? The main reason for the drain is to help make cleaning a little easyer, a back up for the shower drain, and we have pets and would put a water dish in the bath room so the drain could make spill less of a pain to clean up.

    Thank you!

  2. #2

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    I don't think it's a bad idea. I was recently faced with a similar decision but decided not to because of asthetics.

    Tom

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    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    As per code in our area floor drains must be 3".This may cause a problem
    as it would need trapped and vented as floor joist space is only 12' max.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Personal opinion: A floor drain doesn't make a lot of sense unless the floor is sloped to the drain and the rest of the floor is waterproof. You would either need a trap primer or remember to dump some water down it periodically, since otherwise, the trap would dry out and leave an open connection to the sewer. A lot of trouble. Maybe in a room where you have a washing machine, but not even there for most people. A pan with a connection to a drain is easier, especially since then the whole floor isn't sloped.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Consultant cwhyu2's Avatar
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    Yes you are right Jad.

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    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking floor drains in wood floors

    We have installed floor drains on second and third floors
    in night-clubs under their bar serving areas before..

    they were indirect floor drains for ice ect this can really
    be a very sloppy wet mess especially on a third floor made of wood......

    What I came up with for the bar...was a commercial shower pan liner and drain by J R.Smith

    but you can use a cheap plastic shower pan type drain with the clamping ring..

    you get some of the shower pan membrane and make about a 24 - 30 inch square with the drain in the center and clamp that membrane into place...

    you decide where you want to put the drain and cut out
    the floor to the exact size for the hole of the drain....

    you go down into the crawl space and set the drain into place and then with a heavy duty staple gun you staple that membrane up to the wood floor useing a lot of staples to keep in place...this keeps the water from ever spilling into the crawl space ...

    then you hook up the trap and plumb in in..

    and you screw down the drain to the right height in the
    wood floor and I would seal it into place with silicone.....


    I doubt your plumber is going to be very enthusiastic about doing this ...

    it was a lot of work on top of a 12 foot ladder
    and i dont think it will be any better in a crawl space either.

    but it worked great and I never heard a peep from them.




  7. #7
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    After all the holes from the staples, how'd it hold water? Also, without a slope, how'd it get to the drain? In most cases, I still don't think it is worth the effort.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking flooor drains in wood fooors

    I stapled the membraine up to the woood floor
    along its outer edje.. useing a load of 1/2 staples

    the biggest problem was
    getting it to hang at the right height and getting it to
    hang level so the drain lid would be level for the
    tile man to tile up to,,, I had to do 4 of them
    it took a little work and
    a helper on the next floor up with a level...

    it worked very well , basicaly just like a shower pan
    it caught any water that might spill out to about 15 inches in any direction from the drain.

    After we started this 4 story nightclub,
    we found out it was going to be Indys biggest
    GAY BAR...

    So I never wanted to come back to the place for any
    complaints

  9. #9
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
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    Thank's for the comments. I knew it could be done but was not sure if it was worth the trouble. At least I found out before I bought any thing. All in all it does not sound like it is worth it. Maybe in the next house we will go with tile and a walk in shower.

  10. #10
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    I see these in new houses on the 2nd floor laundry room, done in sheet vinyl. They provide a great backup for a washing machine flood, but I doubt if they are perfectly waterproof in a situation where there is frequent heavy water usage.

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    It would be almost impossible to set a floor drain in a wood floor and make it even partially watertight. And the phrase, "better quality stick down vinyl" is close to being an oxymoron. It would have to be one or the other.

  12. #12
    Sound and Light Suppervisor for a School District tjbaudio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj
    It would be almost impossible to set a floor drain in a wood floor and make it even partially watertight. And the phrase, "better quality stick down vinyl" is close to being an oxymoron. It would have to be one or the other.
    I guess they are probably not vinyal. I am not sure what they are. What we have is better than the armostrong crap. but not as hard as the industrial school room stuff. We also followd the install and prep instructions. Un like the previous owners who put the 20 cent tiles over particle board. We just dont like the feel of ceramic tile.

  13. #13
    Master Plumber Dunbar Plumbing's Avatar
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    In KY the inspector has discretion to use the application of the similar minimum requirement of a floor drain in a utility room which is 2".

    3' would be my recommendation.

    In Ohio you are allowed a floor drain on a wood floor only if the material leading to the floor drain is rolled goods and cantered to the drain. The floor can be cantered by cutting long run shims off of a 2X4 or 2X8 to achieve the gentle sloping to the drain without materially affecting the users habits of walking/standing on the floor.


    It can be useful but remember that you will have to periodically add water to that drain to keep a proper liquid seal to prevent sewer gases/foul odors from emitting into the room.

    The bathroom vent to remove foul air to the outside will be the first situation to suck sewer gases out of the drainage system when that trap dries up.
    Read what the end of this sentence means.

  14. #14
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    I think you are looking at an imaginary problem and considering spending money on something that will actually diminish the value of the property.

    If I were buying a house with a floor drain in the bathroom (other than something on a concrete slab) I would be thinking about how much it would cost me to get rid of it.

  15. #15
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    i hid my two floor drains discreetly where they go unnoticed. Not in the center of the floor. I sloped the floors 1/8th" per foot. I used large tiles, 11"x19", so the slope is almost impossible to notice and it all goes in one direction.

    We love it. It took a lot of thinking before doing.

    David

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