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Thread: Replacing Glass in 100 Y.O. Window

  1. #1

    Default Replacing Glass in 100 Y.O. Window

    Is it possible to remove the sash from the frame? It seems like it's built right into the frame in this old style wooden window. And then how would you go about putting the new window back into the frame once you replaced the glass?
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  2. #2
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
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    Default glass replacement...

    Eric,there should be a small piece of trim that the window rides up against that can be removed,Hard to tell with all that paint...is there a pully wheel up in each of the top corners?The window more than likely had sash counter weights that are behind the side trim pieces.I'd be suprised if the sash weight ropes haven't broken. Looks like the window hasn't worked properly in many "moons"...Remember, old windows used lead based glazing (that old glazing gets as hard as concrete!) and looks like there is plenty of lead based paint under those "forty" coats of paint.You will most likely need a paint film cutter if the window has been painted in.It's a wafer thin serrated blade with a handle to literally "saw thru the paint between the window frame and the runners...if you need to replace the sash weight ropes you will have to take the side trim pieces off to get to them.
    You might already know all this but others reading the post may find the info useful...

  3. #3
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Old dog pretty much summed it up. That window frame only looks like one piece because of all the paint. The wood closest to the sash is a stop molding, tacked in place. Use a utility knife to score the paint at the joint, to minimize cracking. Use a stiff putty knife to gently pry it out. Work from one end up, prying a little at a time so you dont split the wood.

  4. #4

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    Thanks. There are about 40 coats of paint on this frame, so it's hard to tell if there is a separate piece of stop molding that can be removed. There's no Pully or counter weights. These windows just move up and down the inside groove with no mechanical aid and lock in place with a spring bolt. The window actually still works just fine if not for the broken glass.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 08-17-2007 at 09:18 AM.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    how do they stay up once you've opened them?
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

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    Engineer Furd's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by molo
    how do they stay up once you've opened them?
    He wrote: "...and lock in place with a spring bolt."

    This was common a hundred or more years ago. The bolt is about 5/16 inch in diameter, and has a somewhat decorative turning that also gives it a shoulder that allows a person to easily grip it. It is in the side frame of the window, usually one on each side, and they are spring-loaded to push into holes drilled in the casing. In order to move the window from a fixed position you have to grasp each bolt and pull it inward and then move the window.

  7. #7
    General Contractor Carpenter toolaholic's Avatar
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    Default I use to build My own windows

    This is basic, to a REAL carpenter! Why are You contracting or doing this work?
    Your questions tell Me, You haven't a clue about this! Maybe I'm being hard ,
    but it's the truth.

  8. #8

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    I may not be a "real" carpenter. But you're definitely a "real" a$$hole.

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    lol

    Lol
    "Any American who is prepared to run for President should automatically, by definition, be disqualified from ever doing so."
    Gore Vidal.

  10. #10
    DIY Senior Member CHH's Avatar
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    Good call Verdeboy. Maybe toolaholic was born knowing everything but the rest of us have to learn it. Bet he is real fun to be around on the jobsite.

  11. #11
    General Contractor, Farmer HandyAndy's Avatar
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    Default

    two links that may help you a little:

    http://www.vancouverheritagefoundati...ohwindows.html

    http://www.nps.gov/hps/tps/briefs/brief09.htm

    you may want to check with your home center or lumber yard and see what kind of replacement window is available for that opening,

    one that is double glazed and workable and more weather tight, (with out the 35 layers of paint).

  12. #12
    G.C. 22+ years(in 3 states) Old Dog's Avatar
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    Talking no more coffee...

    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy
    I may not be a "real" carpenter. But you're definitely a "real" a$$hole.
    LMFAO!!!!
    I gotta stop drinking coffee while i'm up on this site...don't know how many more times the old computer will withstand me spraying coffee all over it!!
    I know "real" carpenters who have never seen old windows much less work on them.
    some guys need to do this to others to make themselves feel better.the old"if I can't dazzle them with my own brilliance,then baffle them with bulls***!"
    I don't tolerate that type of s*** attitude on my jobsites.I've canned alot of otherwise good workers and thrown off subs for less BS than he tosses around on his posts.Keep asking questions...THATS HOW WE ALL LEARN!!

  13. #13
    Jack of all trades frenchie's Avatar
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    Do you have access to the outside? No need to go through all that paint & removing the trim piece, you should be able to swap out the glass without removing the sash. Just chip & scrape away the old glazing, pop in the new glass, re-glaze it.

    Wear a good mask, there's sure to be lead paint under there.

    Trying to get the piece of trim out is going to leave you with massive paint chipping, even after you've cut through most of it; and a lot of the time the wood's weaker than the paint by now, so it'll get destroyed in the process, leading to a whole lot of patching...
    Master Plumber Mark:

    there is nothing better than the
    manly smell of WD 40 in the air
    while banging away on brass with a chisel and hammer...

    it smells like......victory......

    do not hit your thumb...
    __________________
    Just so everyone's clear: I'm the POODLE in the picture ("french", get it?) The hot woman is my wife.

  14. #14

    Default

    Actually, removing the window stop trim was a piece of cake. That window is pretty high up and there was a gnarly old tree in the way. So, I'm glad it came out so easily. The owner wants plexiglass, so plexiglass it will be. The original builders are probably turning over in their graves.

  15. #15
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Consider Lexan...stronger, less affected by UV, and you can get it with scratch resistant coatings.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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