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View Full Version : Quickest/best way to paint cabinet doors?



blown
09-10-2011, 12:15 AM
I have 10 cabinet doors to paint and I'm in a time crunch this weekend, so I don't have time to screw around. The doors are currently painted with a black oil-based enamel. I've removed the hinges and sanded lightly. The new paint is acrylic enamel (this is what I was provided).

Should I try to use a roller? I have a weenie roller and some foam roller covers. I was going to use a foam brush around the edges of the inset portion. I thought that would be fast, and the cabinets were painted the same way.

Suggestions? (I don't have access to spray equipment.)

blown
09-13-2011, 01:44 AM
I did a coat using the weenie roller and foam cover and it worked well, but I'm not happy with the difference in sheen between the brushed parts and the rolled parts with this semigloss black. I tried some with a foam brush and some with a bristle brush. I'm thinking about doing a second coat completely with a bristle brush.

What is your experience with this?

nelrossen10
10-21-2011, 02:57 AM
Either paint one side at a time (a lot of time spent waiting to dry) or use the hinge screw holes like a picture hanger. Take a couple of screws and put them back in the holes with picture wire around them. Hang them on something so you can get to all sides. Even though this will save time, it would be better to lay them flat and use the first method. The paint won't run near as much and you will end up doing a better job when it's all over. Don't worry about sealing, they will be fine.

leejosepho
10-21-2011, 05:17 AM
I did a coat using the weenie roller and foam cover and it worked well, but I'm not happy with the difference in sheen between the brushed parts and the rolled parts with this semigloss black. I tried some with a foam brush and some with a bristle brush. I'm thinking about doing a second coat completely with a bristle brush.

What is your experience with this?
Some paints "lay out" better than others, and then bristles are far better than foam. Rollers are highly-dependent upon a combination of their own quality/type and the actual material (paint) being applied in order to leave a smooth finish.

Be cautious about a second coat on doors that had not been stripped of all previous paint since the doors might end up being too large "around the edges of the inset portion" if that part is on the inside where the doors fit into the cabinet faces.

jimbo
10-21-2011, 07:06 AM
First, I hope you put a primer on that oil.

A brush and roller always give different textures. I painted a chest recently, and used the method I have also used on panel doors: use a roller to lay on the paint over a large surface, then brush over that to get the brush texture. Use a 1/2" nap roller, and don't skimp on paint....lay on a good coat so that it can be brushed out.
I use a 2" angle sash for most work, and if it is larger then a 2" or even 3" flat sash.

If you didn't pay close to $20 for the brush, you are barking up a rope. A good brush is an investment, and properly cared for will serve you well. I have a 2 I call 'old henry'. It is about 20 years old, and although I am only an occasional painter, and far from a rembrandt, old henry will cut in a line to make the old master proud!

Be sure you own a brush comb, and clean the brush well after each use. Soap and water for latex will work ok, rinse well, then wrap in multiple layers of paper towel to hold the bristles. After several hours, remove the wet paper towels, rewrap in dry towels or rags to protect it in storage.