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View Full Version : Wiring GFIs together, is this code?



jjohnson
04-03-2009, 08:02 AM
Is this acceptable under NEC code? I understand it could be a nuissance if the GFI that is closer to the panel trips, the far end one will not have power either. But according to code, and as a general safety question, is this allowable?

See attached picture for an explanation.

jadnashua
04-03-2009, 08:21 AM
I don't know if it is code or not, but I think you are asking for LOTS of trouble. Press the test button of the first one in line, and you'll likely trip all of those downstream as well without realizing it. Wire downstream ones off of the line side, or don't use them at all, since they aren't necessary and cost more when you feed the downstream ones from the load side...just put the stickers on the recepticle covers and you're good to go.

jwelectric
04-03-2009, 10:46 AM
Jim you said that backwards. Trip the one on the end and all will trip from there to the panel but the first one will not trip out the end device.

Judging from the looks of the drawing they are wanting to replace a regular receptacle at the end or last bathroom with a GFCI so they don’t have to run from one bath to the other to reset the GFCI.

I agree that it would be better to wire the first one line in and line out.

jadnashua
04-03-2009, 01:14 PM
Jim you said that backwards. Trip the one on the end and all will trip from there to the panel but the first one will not trip out the end device.


Wasn't sure if the small delay would be sensed in the downstream ones as well...in either case...not a great way to install them.

GabeS
04-03-2009, 01:18 PM
I thought that if he runs the downstream outlets off of the load side of the first GFI from the panel, then the whole line goes off. Didn't Jim have it right the first time? Please correct if wrong.

Don't you hate it when you thought you knew something for a long time, but after years, you finally realize you were wrong all along.

jadnashua
04-03-2009, 04:50 PM
Two different points...I was talking about using the test button. Anything downstream from the tested gfci should be disconnected if the first one gets tripped. When you press the test button, you create a small 'leak' to ground calibrated to verify the protection circuits work. There is a slight delay. My thought was that this imbalance would also be felt downstream and all of them would trip, not just the one you were testing. Seems like it may cut off before the response time of the downstream ones can trip, but if you tested the end one, it would likely trip the first one as well.

GabeS
04-03-2009, 06:15 PM
Okay, but if you trip the first one, then that outlet shuts off right?

And if that outlet is feeding the rest downstream, then they all shutoff. no? Unless I'm missing something here. This is assuming you are feeding the downstream outlets off of the load of the first GFI.

killavolt
04-09-2009, 05:55 AM
Why would you install GFCI receptacles downstream of a GFCI receptacle? Any devices downstream of a GFCI receptacle are protected if wired properly. Am I missing something here?

hj
04-09-2009, 06:43 AM
WHY would you even consider it? If it is a single GFCI and it trips you just have to reset that one where you are. There is no need to daisy chain them, just connect all the LINE sides together, with nothing on the LOAD side. The only reason for daisy chaining outlets would be to have all of them protected by a single GFCI.

Scuba_Dave
04-09-2009, 08:17 AM
Why would you install GFCI receptacles downstream of a GFCI receptacle? Any devices downstream of a GFCI receptacle are protected if wired properly. Am I missing something here?

No, not really missing anything

If you are supplying mutliple bathrooms its better to feed off the line & not the load side of the 1st GFCI. That way each GFCI trips independant & each bathroom outlet(s) can be reset from the GFCI in that bathroom

I would never feed another GFCI outlet off the load side of a GFCI
It's a waste of a GFCI