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Shrapnel
08-24-2007, 07:09 PM
Hi, I'm replacing a conventional switch in the bathroom which controlled the exhaust fan. I am placing a timer instead. Upon opening the switch box, I noticed that I only have 1 - black, 1 - white, 1 - bare ground. Therefore, I assume the source is at the fixture.

Exhaust fan is 13 Amps, therefore I figured I needed a 20A Timer (requires white neutral connection). Now, my question is, if the source is at the fixture (fan), would it be safe to use a 5A Timer (which doesnt require a white neutral connection)? If not, how do I connect the timer without access to the extra wire.

Hope this makes sense, I am new at this.

Thanks,

Chris75
08-24-2007, 07:13 PM
Is this a residential exhust fan? Also if this fan actually draws 13 amps, this will definitely be a problem with a 5 amp switch....

jwelectric
08-24-2007, 07:29 PM
Is this a residential exhaust fan?

I see the sheet rock pulling off the walls and the commode lid standing straight up every time the fan is turned on.

Furd
08-24-2007, 11:13 PM
A bathroom fan that is rated at 13 Amps probably has a heater too.

Why not use a spring-wound timer?

leejosepho
08-25-2007, 03:36 AM
Hi, I'm replacing a conventional switch in the bathroom which controlled the exhaust fan. I am placing a timer instead. Upon opening the switch box, I noticed that I only have 1 - black, 1 - white, 1 - bare ground. Therefore, I assume the source is at the fixture.

If those black and white wires were/are connected to the switch, I would guess the black is hot and that the white carries power from the switch to the fan motor already connected to a common (white) on the other side of its windings.


Exhaust fan is 13 Amps ...

As others have already suggested, that is very unlikely ... and here is a nice timer to consider once you get the amperage issue sorted out:

http://www.wattstopper.com/products/details.html?id=105

hj
08-25-2007, 09:23 AM
If the timer has a separate neutral, it must be electronic, so unless you can extend a neutral to the timer you cannot use it. Why not use a mechanical timer that has a knob that turns to the amount of time desired with a maximum of say, 30 minutes?

SteveW
08-25-2007, 06:47 PM
If the timer has a separate neutral, it must be electronic, so unless you can extend a neutral to the timer you cannot use it. Why not use a mechanical timer that has a knob that turns to the amount of time desired with a maximum of say, 30 minutes?


I'm with Furd and hj on this. Any good hardware, or big box, store will have a variety of spring wound timers, with different max. durations (some up to several hours).

leejosepho
08-25-2007, 09:04 PM
If the timer has a separate neutral, it must be electronic, so unless you can extend a neutral to the timer you cannot use it.

Ah, yes, I missed that.