Venting downstream of toilet after it joins main sewer line

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Djd275

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Hello,

I live in Missouri with code following the IPC. Is the venting shown in the top drawing (option 1) an acceptable method?
Distance between the toilet connection into the main line and where the vent would take off is approximately 1ft. The toilet's leg would also only be about 1ft long. There is a floor joist preventing the vent to come directly off the toilet's 3" line (shown in option 2). If needed I can box out the joist to make room, but would prefer to not touch the floor joist. In both options the 2" vent ties into a common atmospheric vent for the remainder of the house.
 

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wwhitney

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If you need the vent to be at the location in option 1, and you don't have obstructions for the 3" drain, you could do option 2 as below. All the 90s are LT90, and the 3-way junctions are combos.

Also, if the "other fixtures upstream" are only bathroom fixtures, with only one WC, there's a chance you can use them to wet vent the new WC and omit a dry vent takeoff. If you are interested in that possibility, go ahead and draw out the complete system so we can tell you if would work.

Cheers, Wayne

toilet venting.jpg
 
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Djd275

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Thank you All for the replies!!
I will adjust the joist as needed to make option 2 work.
One more question. Is there a way to reduce the sewer gases when I break into the main line? Will opening up the inspection port on the septic system help?
The main line is in a crawl space and I want to limit the amount of gas that exits while the line is open (I estimate a few hours from time of cutting the pipe to having everything put back together). I plan to use rags to plug the line while I'm not physically connecting the pipes but was wondering if there are any other tricks of the trade to keep the smell down.
 

wwhitney

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One more option for you, in case it would let you avoid joist modification: if a vented bathroom lavatory (alone or with a shower or tub (but not both, unless it's already 3")) is joining the 3" main nearby (just upstream) of where the WC would join the main in option 1, you could reroute that vented drain to join the 3" WC drain first, and then the combined drain could join the main as in option 1. That would let you omit the dry vent for the WC and wet vent it.

Cheers, Wayne
 

Djd275

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Thank you Wayne,
I dont think wet venting it will work well as upstream includes: the bathroom sink, tub, a laundry unit, a kitchen sink, and another full bathroom with shower, sink, and toilet. I am redoing an old 1890s home, so my options are pretty limited on what I add and where the pipes can run.
Any suggestions on how to limit the sewer gases into the house as I work on the main?
 
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