Dual shower heads at the same time for DIY

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Jetboy55

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I'm getting ready to remodel my main/only full bathroom. It is currently a tub/shower combo. I want to take the room down to studs and install a stand up alcove shower where the tub used to be. This is because my wife and I have always enjoyed showering together, and a tub/shower isn't enough room and the tub shape causes there to be very little "flat" area for good footing, non-slipping. Plus we're getting older, and not having to step over a tub rim would be really nice. This is our forever home, so I'm not worried about resale value from having no tub in the house.
With that said, I would love to install dual shower heads, one on each end of the shower, that would have individual temperature control and often be running at the same time. I have basic plumbing skills (compared to a professional) and have installed several standard tub/showers and water closets. From the research I have done, it would seem that this plumbing project is likely too complicated for me to do myself. There are pressure balancing considerations, supply pipe size considerations, water speed in the pipe limitations, likelyhood of low water acceleration at the shower heads, not to mention running out of hot water quickly from our 50gal heater.
My question is this: Am I over-complicating this, or is this as complicated as it seems, and I should probably avoid it as a DIY install? Thanks.
 

wwhitney

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You could just plumb it as two separate showers (with two separate shower valves), in which case it's no more complicated than a normal shower. Might require a 3/4" hot supply to the area, rather than the usual 1/2" hot for a single shower and lav.

Cheers, Wayne
 

John Gayewski

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I don't think it's that complicate, as Wayne said just use 2 delta r 10000 shower only valves. The pressure balancing occurs in the cartridge of the shower valve. I would probably say you need 40 psi supply pressure in the bathroom to have two showers going at the same time, but that's pretty common to have available.
 

Marlinman

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If you are worried about running out of hot water look into a water heater booster. They increase the amount of hot water from your tank and provide thermostatically controlled water temperature.

 

Jetboy55

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After talking it over this morning with the Mrs., she wants to look into upgrading to a whole house tankless system (n.gas) to avoid running out of hot water. Not sure if that affects my decisions concerning two shower heads. I am not yet familiar with how tankless systems affect supply flow/pressure. I would guess pressure is not affected, and tankless are flow rated around 6gpm for n.gas. 6gpm should be sufficient for two modern shower heads, I imagine.
I haven't even touched on addressing the problem of wait times. I am tired of waiting 1 1/2 minutes at the kitchen sink and bathroom for hot water to arrive. I guess this problem will be made worse if I upsize the supply to the bathroom with 3/4 in supply pipe. I know there are several ways to address this, all of which depend on which type of heater I end up using. So yeah, a lot more research to do.
 
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