Condensate Pump Questions

Users who are viewing this thread

HereInOhio

Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
I’m swapping out most of my HVAC and went with a high efficiency furnace and tankless water heater. I’m in the process of remodeling my basement and had an open sump pump that the items drained into but I’m am going to put a cover on it due to high levels of radon thought to come from the sumps open pipes. I’m wondering what everyone would recommend for the best way to drain the fixtures now.

I’m assuming I can tie the water heater and furnace drains in with each other and just deal with one discharge from there. Originally I assumed I should just get a condensate pump such as the little giant 15 series and run it through the ceiling and exit above either the utility sink or washer standpipe box.

Questions:
If I go this route can I use the clear flexible vinyl pipe even if it’s enclosed in the ceiling or would I want to go with pvc, cpvc, or pex?

Is there a decent looking way to discharge it or is the standard to have a small hole in the drywall right above the utility sink and just popping it out? I would prefer the standpipe box but sometimes the newer washer pipes are the exact size and lock into the box.

Any recommendations on a specific pump?

Any other thoughts and recommendations?

The other option I’m thinking of is to leave the drain in the sump pump and just use one of the grommets that you use to seal the sump power cord to block air from escaping.
 

Sylvan

Still learning
Messages
2,501
Reaction score
596
Points
113
Location
New York
You assumed wrong

"I’m assuming I can tie the water heater and furnace drains in with each other and just deal with one discharge from there"

Look at the ASME code and the NBBI Codes regarding safety and relief valve discharge piping
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
2,680
Reaction score
696
Points
113
Location
Iowa
A relief valve needs to drain by gravity and preferably wouldn't tie together with anything. The condensate can drain into a receiver (but the water heater needs a condensate neutralizer)and then be pumped.

These are things that need to be planned in advance not figured out after you've decided the layout od the appliances. The appliances should be placed within a certain distance of a drain.
 

HereInOhio

Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
"I’m assuming I can tie the water heater and furnace drains in with each other and just deal with one discharge from there"

Look at the ASME code and the NBBI Codes regarding safety and relief valve discharge piping
Will do, thank you. The assumption was made based on several pictures I saw of the condensate drain for the tankless water heater going to a tee from the furnace. To clarify, I am specifically referring to the condensate drain and not the relief drain. Thank you for bringing that up because that’s something else I need to consider. The relief drain of my tank just went onto the floor. There was an open sump pit I’m assuming they considered a drain but will be covered. I may still be able to discharge it into the sump if that’s allowed since draining and sumps are separated in this city.

Thanks for the reply!
 

HereInOhio

Member
Messages
103
Reaction score
3
Points
18
Location
Cleveland, Ohio
A relief valve needs to drain by gravity and preferably wouldn't tie together with anything.

These are things that need to be planned in advance not figured out after you've decided the layout od the appliances. The appliances should be placed within a certain distance of a drain.

My plan was swap the temporary 40 gal tank I installed while remodeling for a 50 gallon tank until yesterday I came across a deal I couldn’t pass up on the tankless. I removed the old tank and I guess I’m in the process of planning out where I should put the tankless before starting the install. I was thought about the venting, gas pipe and drainage and was most stumped about the drainage so figured I would start there. The basement doesn’t have any drains in the floor, it just has a sump pump that I am going to install a cover on but it should have an extra hole in the cover (if allowed?) and now a sewage ejection pump. I did notice the neutralizer on some of the pictures I looked at.

As far as the venting, I sleeved the chimney when going to the high efficiency furnace but now that I may install this I would either have to cut the 2”+ through two 2x10 joists or run the pvc in the chimney. Is it acceptable to cut two 2.5” holes in the rim joist considering it’s load bearing and supporting the weight of that side of the house? There’s still a lot of meat on it but I’m not familiar with hacking that much out of it. Again, I do still have the option of running the pvc down the chimney if that makes more sense.
 

John Gayewski

In the Trades
Messages
2,680
Reaction score
696
Points
113
Location
Iowa
My plan was swap the temporary 40 gal tank I installed while remodeling for a 50 gallon tank until yesterday I came across a deal I couldn’t pass up on the tankless. I removed the old tank and I guess I’m in the process of planning out where I should put the tankless before starting the install. I was thought about the venting, gas pipe and drainage and was most stumped about the drainage so figured I would start there. The basement doesn’t have any drains in the floor, it just has a sump pump that I am going to install a cover on but it should have an extra hole in the cover (if allowed?) and now a sewage ejection pump. I did notice the neutralizer on some of the pictures I looked at.

As far as the venting, I sleeved the chimney when going to the high efficiency furnace but now that I may install this I would either have to cut the 2”+ through two 2x10 joists or run the pvc in the chimney. Is it acceptable to cut two 2.5” holes in the rim joist considering it’s load bearing and supporting the weight of that side of the house? There’s still a lot of meat on it but I’m not familiar with hacking that much out of it. Again, I do still have the option of running the pvc down the chimney if that makes more sense.
It's a question of ratio. You can drill a hole a third the width of the beam. I think that's the limiting factor.

I would keep the sump pit. Find a lid that meets your needs.
 
Top
Hey, wait a minute.

This is awkward, but...

It looks like you're using an ad blocker. We get it, but (1) terrylove.com can't live without ads, and (2) ad blockers can cause issues with videos and comments. If you'd like to support the site, please allow ads.

If any particular ad is your REASON for blocking ads, please let us know. We might be able to do something about it. Thanks.
I've Disabled AdBlock    No Thanks