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Thread: gas stove/range question.

  1. #1

    Default gas stove/range question.

    I'm working on a counter top & sink replacement job. The customer asked if I knew how to turn down the gas going to his stove. It is about 9 years old and a cheap sears product ... has a digital clock for what that's worth. I know nothing about these but can clean them up and make them work okay. I have no idea what to do for a stove that's getting "too much" gas. Any help here?

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    First of all, you're not qualified to work on gas appliances, and if you did work on the stove and later if there was any problems, you'd be on the hook. Second, the gas into any gas appliance is regulated by the applance controls, not the supply line and/or the cut off valve. In other words, there is no such thing as a gas appliance getting too much gas. Don't touch it.

  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Does the home run on propane gas?

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default stove

    There is no such thing as an appliance "getting" too much gas, but it can "use" too much gas. For that condition the burner orifices have to be modified or adjusted. DO NOT touch them unless you know exactly what you are doing, because you can create an unsafe condition if you mess it up.

  5. #5

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    Yes... the home has propane. I questioned him about the orifice being appropriate to be sure he doesn't have the orifice for natural gas. I have already told him..."the simple solution is simply not to turn it as high as it will go." I'll be back there this weekend to plumb the replacement sinks and will refer him to his propane supplier... they will be equipped to handle it and can check the line pressure and regulator.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by hj
    There is no such thing as an appliance "getting" too much gas, but it can "use" too much gas. For that condition the burner orifices have to be modified or adjusted. DO NOT touch them unless you know exactly what you are doing, because you can create an unsafe condition if you mess it up.
    Yeppers... I've seen people drive a nail thru them to open them up more. I've had to clean quite a few but in general do not mess with gas. My eyesight is too bad and I need magnifiers and very good light to tell if they have any obstruction, but that is opposite of the problem this guy is having. I did suggest that he may need a smaller orifice.

  7. #7

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    Gary...not trying to be a smart butt here...but to be qualified (not necessarily "legal")... you only have to know what you're doing... I've seen plenty of bad truck drivers with a CDL and plumbers who couldn't plumb or fix diddly who have plumbers cards....and a whole bunch of those who think they're worth $200 per hour and I would rather pay them to stay away from my job than to be on the job. When messing with gas...well, it's kinda like being a crop duster pilot..there's good ones and dead ones...no in between.

  8. #8
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default range

    Nost ranges have adjustable orifices, but you still have to know what you are doing to adjust them.

  9. #9

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    Is the problem that the gas-to-air mixture needs adjusting because it is burning too rich? Or is the flame just too high even when the knobs are set to the lowest position?

  10. #10
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    It sounds like you have a natural gas unit that needs to have the oriface changed, but no way to tell for sure from here.

  11. #11

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    It's not the air/gas mixture, has blue flame,not yellow and not smoking, It just has too much fire. I've seen what happens with a water heater on propane that has natural gas orifice...waaaayyyyy too much flame. That really could be his problem. I'm gonna refer him to his propane dealer.

  12. #12

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    What happens when you turn the pressure regulator on the tank down? What does the pressure regulator read now?

  13. #13
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default tank

    He doesn't know what he is doing with the range. There is no way he should be touching the tank's regulator, even if he could adjust it.

  14. #14
    Like an engineer alternety's Avatar
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    The range will have specs for max/min pressure. Any other gas devices (e.g. boiler, water heater) on the tank will also have limits. They are probably specified in inches of water.

    If you can find any information plate on the unit that has this information or if there is a manual available, you will then be able to check pressure at the propane regulator and correct the pressure if necessary. This will affect all the other devices using the propane tank.

    You really ought to let the dealer handle it; as you have said.

  15. #15

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    Thanks. If he wants me to take a deeper look at it I will. I do have a little knowledge of working with gas and a little with stoves. Just knowing what to look for is the big thing...and not being stupid. Bad thing about gas is that it is heavier than air and can collect on the floor where it can blow your house up... actually seen that happen before....very strange sight.

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