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Thread: Toilet vent

  1. #1

    Default Toilet vent

    I'm moving my 2nd bathroom toilet into an unused cavity in my home. It's about a 3 foot move from the current location and will allow the kids some privacy while others are brushing their teeth 'example'.
    Question is: can I use the vent that exist now? 3 feet away or should I put one closer to the toilet and vent up thru the unsheet rocked walls and re connect near the attic? then seal it all up with sheet rock. Of course using the current vent will save time and effort. However I do not want to seal it up only to find smell from a bad vent job.
    Thanks experts

  2. #2
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default drawing will help, yea or nay

    Are you aware of the height requirements for venting that goes horizontally? You best draw your situation, or the proposed solution, to get comments.

    david

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Most codes require a vent within 6 feet for a toilet.

  4. #4

    Default Vent

    Thanks Terry, Great site you have.
    So my 3 feet to the existing vent shold be o.k.
    Great

  5. #5
    Plumber/Gasfitter dubldare's Avatar
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    The trap arm (what your toilet is now connected to) may only be offset horizontally a maximum of 90 from it's vent without reventing.

    Do not count the closet bend toward the 90 rule.
    --Customers of plumbers: Never be afraid to ask for proof of licensure of the plumber servicing your equipment. A licensed plumber will be proud to show you his personal license.--

  6. #6

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    The position 3 feet away from the existing location and will have a downward flow and only one 90 degree angle from the new location just below the toilet the rest are 45 degree bends. The existing vent is vertical off a drop to the first floor and goes up to the attic and out. Let me know if you see issues or if I tie in to existing works.
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  7. #7
    Plumber solsacre's Avatar
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    Default

    The trap arm (what your toilet is now connected to) may only be offset horizontally a maximum of 90 from it's vent without reventing.


    Not a solid rule. Check your local plumbing code... buy a plumber a beer, make a friend and don't be afraid to ask dumb questions.

    You can run 135 d before the toilet vent in Oregon.. .. other states?

    If you need more than 6 feet to your vent, some states will let you up-size to 4 inch and run 10 foot to the vent.

    and no mater what you do to come code complient..... If you are good at talking you can convince the AA (adminastratieve athority) or the AHJ (administrator having juristiction) or whatever you call your inspector, to approve most anything... as long as it works.good luck

    dances-with-pumps
    Last edited by solsacre; 11-17-2006 at 10:17 PM.

  8. #8
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking very lucky in Indiana

    Indiana has gone to BOCA--andCABO code a long time ago and its great...

    Use to have the UPC code and was always trouble....
    having to run a 3 inch vent completely out the roof
    on a new home was always trouble....


    Here you dont even need to have a vent for the toilet,

    if thier is a vent 10-20or 30 feet away in the bathroom, it will work ok....

    becasue a toilet is suposed to siphon when it is flushed anyway...

    any sized vent line keeps the system at
    the same neutral level of static pressure.....



    their reasoning is that nothing bigger than the toillet line
    is ever going to go down that drain line...... so it is virtually
    impossible to totally fill the 3 or 4 inch line and make the toilet siphon.....

    therefore it realy does not need a dedicated vent or a full 3 inch vent going outthe roof

    alll around town you see 1 1/2 vent stacks for the complete
    home plumbing system...it saves the constructionplumber tons of money


    everything has been working fine for years...

    except when some poor bastard needs to clean an abstruction
    out of his pipes from the roof....LOL
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 11-18-2006 at 05:37 AM.

  9. #9
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Yeah, when he has to go through the roof to clear a clog......what then????

  10. #10
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking thats not my problem--I dont do sewers....

    I dont know what you would have to do
    if you had a clog from the second floor down to the first....

    with PVC pipe I dont think it happens very often at all...

    The code claims that the toilet is considered a full sized
    clean out access
    which I suppose it really is ....

    and you would have to be a
    real idiot to carry a full sized sewer
    machine up on a two story roof when you could
    clean it from the toilet....


    and of course their is awlays a two way clean out tee in
    the front of the home....


    the only down side I see to a 1 1/2 vent going out the roof is it
    totally freezing up in the winter.... in bitter cold temps....
    and killing the vent off completely....


    but that has not been much of a problem either....

    and besides they always thaw out in the spring....LOL

  11. #11
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default codes

    The IPC was an "upgrade" of the CABO/BOCA codes which were so lenient that there was absolutely nothing prohibited as long as it allowed the house to be built cheaper, giveing the builder a higher profit margin because he was not lowering the sale price. In this case, however, you have mixed a plan view and an elevation so we cannot really tell what you are doing. Your description implies a 90 bend and three 45's which seems over the top for what you are doing, and would not pass most codes.

  12. #12
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default the stack.

    Quote Originally Posted by ll1000a
    The position 3 feet away from the existing location and will have a downward flow and only one 90 degree angle from the new location just below the toilet the rest are 45 degree bends. The existing vent is vertical off a drop to the first floor and goes up to the attic and out. Let me know if you see issues or if I tie in to existing works.
    the description (quoted above) is not clear, to me. The diagram is good but not good enough, for me.

    Do you know whether your tub and existing toilet are on the same branch, or whether they connect to the stack separately as shown in your drawing? This is important, since you are on the 2nd floor and you probably want to minimize reworking at the stack connections -- it is not like being in a basement where you have lots of space and access.

    I saw a vent going to the tub. That vent can be used to vent upstream of your new toilet.

    Here is what i think i do know (subject to confirmation from people who know Code very well): Two toilets on a branch line requires venting between the two, and the second toilet connects with a Wye. Two toilets and a tub on a branch line also requires venting, upstream of both toilets. One toilet and one tub, the same requirements.

    There is a probably a lot i don't know about plumbing, so i may not be helping at all. For example, I can't help with the discussion about 90 and 45 and 135 degree angles.

    david

  13. #13

    Default

    I heard there cannot be many 90 degree bent and 45's were o.k. (thus I did 1 90) and the location where this project is I need the bends to route the sewer.
    Not trying to minimize anything I do think the gentelman which said I should be o.k. even up to 10 feet may be correct. I'ts literally a small move. Thank you all !

  14. #14
    Plumber Winslow's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dubldare
    The trap arm (what your toilet is now connected to) may only be offset horizontally a maximum of 90 from it's vent without reventing.

    Do not count the closet bend toward the 90 rule.
    Not sure which code is applicable here but the UPC allows a toilet to turn 135 degrees

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