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Thread: Panasonic Whisper Warm?

  1. #16
    DIY Member zimmee66's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
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    Default re: panasonic whispr warm

    I installed a whisperfit and I would never go back to a broan.

    For one thing, people are tempted to turn off loud fans prematurely and so they dont vent the moisture fully.

    http://www.easycarts.net/ecarts/terr...Bath_Fans.html
    Last edited by Reader Review; 02-10-2007 at 11:13 AM.

  2. #17
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Zimmee, thank you for that last comment. My old fan was quite noisy, and wife refused to use it when she took a bath. We has some problems with mold. Now with the 1.0, she cooperates!

  3. #18
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    I looked at the link Zimmee put up for the panasonic vents. I noticed that the ceiling vents on that page run the air out the side and not straight up. Is that normal? Also can somebody recommend a manufacturer or model name for a good vent/light unit for a bathroom that is 50 sq. ft.?

    TIA,
    Molo

  4. #19
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Panasonic & Broan are 2 major brands. Generally the quieter the fan--the more you are likely to pay.
    Selection is wide open with lots of choices. Depends on what features are important to you vs. how much you want to spend.

    In my case--the choices were few because I didn't want to pay a lot-but needed the heat feature. My Broan was 75 dollars...and yea...it's a little noisy for some people. But not for me.
    Installation was a PITA but it was worth it. No more chilly winter bathroom...

    Mike

  5. #20
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    From the reading I've done today it appears that going through the roof with the vent can actually cause a problem with condensation inside the pipe that runs into the vent unit itself. The reading I've done states that it is more desirable to run the vent out the side of the house or the soffit. Can anyone confirm or deny what the best method is?

    TIA,
    Molo

  6. #21
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
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    Hopefully a pro will respond to your concern...

    Many typical/various moisture issues don't affect me as I live in the Desert region of Southern California.

    Mike

  7. #22
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Install a good dampered roof vent and use well insulated vent material and I doesn't seem to be that big of a deal. Note, the longer the run, the more trouble this becomes. Running it out to a soffit is not a great idea - it neads to vent outside directly.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  8. #23
    DIY Senior Member molo's Avatar
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    Hello and thanks for the response,

    Jadnashua, the soffit vent method does in fact take the vent outside. It exits the soffit with the same vent housing that is used in going out the side of the home.
    Also, It is true (from my research) that the shorter the run and insulating the run both reduce condensation. Will the damper that you are referring to also help?

    Thanks,
    Molo

  9. #24
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Any time you can reduce unwanted airflow, the better.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #25
    DIY Junior Member eolafan's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua View Post
    They're ususally easier to replace from the top.
    You want a Broan model QTRE080R, which is 80 cfm and 0.8 sones and can be installed replacign an existing fan (in most cases) without going into the attic based on the special installation features of this unit. Keep in mind this is avilable only in an 80 cfm rating and not with a light. The 80 cfm rating is far and away the most approprite fan size for the average American bathroom.

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