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Thread: HW Tank Installation Advice

  1. #16

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    Wheww! No leaks in any of my seams.

    Here's a pic of the completed job and what the old heater looks like on the bottom.

    I didn't plumb the T&P valve because there's no drain, only a dirt floor in this cellar.

    I'm not sure if the vent I used is up to code, not that anyone will care here. It's just a piece of 3" rigid vent and not any kind of double-walled vent.
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  2. #17
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    The T&P not being plumbed down won't matter as long as no one is standing next to it if it trips.

    You don't need double wall where you replaced the piece of vent. Does it have any sheet metal screws holding it to the hat or the old vent. It really should to prevent any possibility of monoxide poisoning from falling off.
    Last edited by Cass; 11-22-2006 at 04:20 AM.

  3. #18
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    Smile

    Verdeboy,
    hats off to you for doing a job like that. Basically a moneyloser in horrible working conditions. Just remember, your treasure for doing this job is stored up in heaven.

  4. #19
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default Set Temp not greater than 120 F

    I hope you set the temperature low enough to keep that white pipe on the hot water side from failing. PVC pressure rating is 40% at 120 F, 30% at 130 F, 20% at 140 F, and not acceptable at all above 140 F.

    The max operating pressure of 3/4" schedule 40 is 289 psi at 73 F. I would not want to see it above 130 F (leaves you about 90 psi operating pressure) and I would prefer to see it at 120 F.

    Burst pressures are about 5 time those pressures, but that is the margin that takes care of the bending load on sagging unsupported pipes.

  5. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    I hope you set the temperature low enough to keep that white pipe on the hot water side from failing. PVC pressure rating is 40% at 120 F, 30% at 130 F, 20% at 140 F, and not acceptable at all above 140 F.

    The max operating pressure of 3/4" schedule 40 is 289 psi at 73 F. I would not want to see it above 130 F (leaves you about 90 psi operating pressure) and I would prefer to see it at 120 F.

    Burst pressures are about 5 time those pressures, but that is the margin that takes care of the bending load on sagging unsupported pipes.

    Everything I used was CPVC. I believe it's rated to 180 degrees. Next time, I'll go copper all the way. I got a headache from all those solvent fumes. I set the thermostat right in the middle, but I didn't have a thermometer to check the actual temp.

    One more question:

    When I went to light it, I noticed dielectric nipples taped to the underside of the tank. I had used some that I bought from the hardware store. The ones that it came with had a flow restriction on one side along with a rubber flap that completely closed off one side. Does anyone know why they have that "feature" and which side goes up or down when you install them?

  6. #21
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The heat traps help to prevent hot water from escaping via convection unless a valve is opened. It helps save energy. They're usually color coded for the specific port. If installed backwards, you will restrict or maybe even stop flow into and out of the tank.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #22

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    They are both the same color--blue. Is the side with the flap installed up or down?

  8. #23
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The flap needs to be able to open with the water flow (i.e., a valve opened, but close to help restrict convection flow. My guess is it should hinge away from the normal flow.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  9. #24
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    "Everything I used was CPVC. I believe it's rated to 180 degrees."

    That horizontal white pipe with gray fittings in the first picture of your Post 16 is the same white pipe with gray fittings that is shown in the second and third pictures of Post 1. That doesn't look like any CPVC that I have ever seen, and the hot water flows through one of them.

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    The flap needs to be able to open with the water flow (i.e., a valve opened, but close to help restrict convection flow. My guess is it should hinge away from the normal flow.
    Actually, the flap opens in or out to the same degree. I just don't know whether the end with the flap should be up or down, or if it even matters. I might just throw them away and keep using the ones with no restrictions or flaps.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 11-24-2006 at 07:11 PM.

  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    "Everything I used was CPVC. I believe it's rated to 180 degrees."

    That horizontal white pipe with gray fittings in the first picture of your Post 16 is the same white pipe with gray fittings that is shown in the second and third pictures of Post 1.
    You're right. I replaced all the bad piping up to the PVC. But they don't have any money to replace the PVC that should never have been installed inside in the first place.

    So, the temp. is set to the low end of the thermostat. I'm sure one day the PVC will fail, and then she'll have to replace it. It's already becoming brittle. I couldn't even use a hacksaw to cut it without it splintering. I had to use my rotozip to get a nice smoothe edge.

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