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Thread: Flange height

  1. #1

    Default Flange height

    Great forum. Just joined but have been visiting and learning for a while.
    I can't seem to find an answer to this question which I know for you veterans will be easy to answer.
    I know the toilet flange is mounted on top of the finished floor BUT how far can the flange be seperated from the waste pipe in the floor that the toilet sits over?
    If it is too high from the waste pipe would that allow sewer gases to escape into the bathroom due to the flange and waste pipe not being close enough to each other?
    Thanks guys.......

    Speedy

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The flange is securely attached to the waste pipe. If there is any gap, it is installed wrong. If it is pvc, it is normally solvent welded. If it is cast iron, it is usually a poured lead/oakum joint. Both of these are water and gas tight...I don't understand your question. The flange is not a funnel to direct the waste into the pipe just sitting there, it is an integral part of the path.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3

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    Thanks jad for your response.
    I need to replace a toilet that is using cast iron pipe after I put down a sub-floor and floor tile.
    Could you briefly explain the steps I would take after I remove the old toilet to properly install a new toilet on top of the finished floor or should I leave this one to a pro.

    Thank you

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Depends on how handy you are. Probably the strongest flange is one leaded to the CI pipe. If you haven't done this or have the right tools, it is best left for a pro. But getting the old one off isn't too bad. There are CI flanges that use a gasket and clamp to reattach a new one that could be done by the average joe. If the pipe is 4" in diameter, you can put a flange inside. If it is 3", it needs to go outside. Keep that in mind when tiling around the pipe in case you need to make room to insert the new flange.

    What many people do, if they have access, is to cut off the CI and replace it with pvc, which is easier to work with and glue together. The transition between materials is easy with the right metal reinforced rubber (neoprene?) sleeve and screw clamps.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5

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    Thanks Jim.
    Can you give me some tips for removing the old flange?

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Rather than go through it again, use the search function in the blue bar. It's been discussed numerous times. Basically, get some of the lead out (drilling small holes does it one way), they pry the lead out, pull out the oakum, and wrestle it off if it doesn't fall off on its own.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

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    Thanks jad for your help and patience....

  8. #8
    DIY Junior Member L. Thomas's Avatar
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    Default Problem flange height?

    I want to install a new Linoleum tile floor in the bathroom . It will need to have the subflooring covered with luann (sp?). A new toilet will be installed.

    Is replacing the toilet a job that weekend warrior can attempt or is this a job for a professional?

    The toliet will be installed in the same place and I have a basement so I have easy access to the bathroom floor. I need someone to explain how to deal with the flange height. What problems might I expect and what should I do?
    Last edited by L. Thomas; 11-18-2006 at 09:54 AM.
    Researching toilets to enjoy retiring in retirement

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Replacing a toilet is easy until you have problems!

    The better choice on the toilet flange is to cut off the existing one and install a new riser and flange on top of the new finished floor. If that isn't possible (well, it techincally is possible, but you don't want to spend th emoney to do it!), then you can add extender rings to the existing flange, or worst choice, but easiest, use either a double or extra thick wax ring to make the seal.

    You probably will want to replace the shutoff vavle and use a new supply line to the toilet. Best choice here is a 1/4-turn ball valve. Depending on the piping in the wall, it will either be screwed on, soldered on, or a compression fit.

    Do some reading here, and you'll get the idea. Choose a good toilet, or you'll be kicking yourself and plunging. They are definately not all created equal.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

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