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Thread: Supply lines and drain for washing machines.

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    Default Supply lines and drain for washing machines.

    I know running pipes in insulated outside walls is not permitted but are there any exceptions for basements. I've insulated the foundation wall with R7.5 extruded foam then built a 2X4 wall frame with Roxul (Mineral Wool) R13.5 batts. My stackable washer/dryer are located on the outside wall and I would like to conceal the plumbing in the wall if at all possible. Am I asking for trouble?

    P.S. I live in Ottawa, Canada where it gets very cold in the winter.

    Thanks
    Marc Savage

  2. #2
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    If the outside walls are well below ground level, I wouldn't worry. Make sure there are no drafts on the pipes.....There is probably heat in the basement?

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by plumber1
    If the outside walls are well below ground level, I wouldn't worry. Make sure there are no drafts on the pipes.....There is probably heat in the basement?
    The basement is heated and I would be running the pipes 24" of the floor and proximately 3' blow outside ground level.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Marc

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I'd keep the pipes between the finished wall and the insulation. In other words, don't insulate the pipes from the basement's heat.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    Thanks for the advice guys. I have another question regarding the diameter of the standpipe connected to the supply box. I know that I'm supposed use 2" but I was wondering if I can reduce the diameter to 1.5" after the trap to make easier to run the pipe through the 16' 2x4 wall. Am I going to run into an overflow situation?

    Thanks

    Marc Savage

  6. #6
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    That's a major NO-NO. You never reduce the size of a drain. You must stay the same or increase the size.

  7. #7
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Also washing machines of today discharge water at a greater rate than they once did.

  8. #8

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    Could you add 2X2's to the studs to give room for 2" pipe?

  9. #9
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    I was talking to a plumber this afternoon and he told me that the code here in Ontario is 1-1/2" for the laundy standpipe. I have a front load LG washer....will I run into problems using 1-1/2"?

  10. #10
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    You may. As previously noted, newer washers discharge water much faster than older models and this can overload a 1-1/2" drain. That's why 2" is now code in most places.

  11. #11
    In the Trades kordts's Avatar
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    Drill a 2-9/16" hole thru the 2x4's, we do it all the time.

  12. #12
    Homeowner geniescience's Avatar
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    Default 1.5" drain for Washer is OK for me too

    I'm close to you Marc and my concrete highrise condo building was equipped with a 1.5" drain and 1.5" vent for washing machines, in each condo unit. After a run of 12 feet, they then drain into a 2" stack.

    No matter how hard I try to get plumbers and buildgin professionals here to tell me that a 2" pipe is required, I never get that answer.

    On the other hand, everyone in every discussion forum always says that a 2" diameter drain is required.

    So I guess that Ontario and Quebec (at least) do not require a 2" pipe, and that nobody has pointed that out here. Until now. But that is only a guess.

    My front-loading washer is several years old now and it drains fine. Kenmore.

    David

  13. #13
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    I've finished the back wall framing and I'm ready to do the plumbing. If you look at the pictures in order you'll see where I've installed supply box and where the drain pipe needs to go at the end of the second wall. The length is approx. 8' + 1-90deg elbow + 8' to the 1-1/2" copper pipe. The supply box is 32" off the floor and I'll be making my connection to the main copper pipe about 7" off the floor.

    I'll be using 1-1/2" ABS

    -Is my supply box high enough?
    -How much slope should I plan for? Is 1/4"per foot enough?
    -Should the vent be as close as possible to the trap with a max of distance of 3'?
    -Can I tie in a utility sink I am installing on the second wall under the window to the same drain pipe?

    http://ca.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/mar.../ph//my_photos

    Thanks for the help guys.

    Marc
    Last edited by MarcSavage; 11-16-2006 at 02:16 PM.

  14. #14
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    When putting new things in...you are really doing yourself a disservice by not using 2" for a washing machine drain. While some washing machines will fare well with a smaller one, many (not all) won't work well without a 2" drain line. The area on a 2" line is nearly twice as large...it will flow a bunch more water faster than a 1.5" line. The slightest restriction in the pipe, and you may have water everywhere.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  15. #15
    DIY Junior Member MarcSavage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    When putting new things in...you are really doing yourself a disservice by not using 2" for a washing machine drain. While some washing machines will fare well with a smaller one, many (not all) won't work well without a 2" drain line. The area on a 2" line is nearly twice as large...it will flow a bunch more water faster than a 1.5" line. The slightest restriction in the pipe, and you may have water everywhere.
    I appreciate the response. I've received so many different opinions on using 1-1/2" vs. 2" I don't know what to do. Granted using 2" will eliminate any possible backup problems I have one hesitation. I'm not quite sure how to tackle the connection to what looks like a 2" cast or galvanized hub.

    I've attached a picture of the drain pipe. With my limited knowledge, looks like 1-1/2" copper into 1-1/2" to 2" brass reducer that is connected to what look like some sort of cast or galvanized flange that is encased in the concrete. Any insights on what is involved with converting this to my 2” ABS?

    Marc
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by MarcSavage; 11-16-2006 at 04:10 PM.

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