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Thread: Installing CPVC tee to drain humidifier

  1. #1
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    Default Installing CPVC tee to drain humidifier

    Hi, I'm wondering if this is a good idea or not. I have a humidifier that has an overflow drain. I just ran clear flexible tubing from the drain to my utility sink. As you can see, the furnace has a drain line made of 3/4" CPVC. I was thinking I could tie the humidifier drain into the CPVC line and get rid of the flexible tubing. I'm not solving any problem here--I just think it would look a little neater.

    I wanted to get a pro's take on this. Any tips on how to do this? Thanks a lot!
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  2. #2
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    Two things. First, the A/C drain is incorrect because it does not have a trap, unless it is off the picture, to minimize air loss. Second, the A/C drain is susceptible to clogging because of the dust it carries. If the drain clogged then the runoff from the humidifier would ovrflow the A/C pan and cause a leak in the blower unit. But if you still want to do it, just place a tee in the line then convert the side inlet to a threaded connection and connect the humidifier drain to a threaded barbed fitting at that tee.

  3. #3
    DIY Member jumpyg's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the response, hj.

    So it sounds like I'm creating a potential problem if I do this. I was only going to do it for appearances anyway, so I don't think it's a good idea now.

    About the trap for the A/C drain: Can you provide a picture or more detail of what that would entail? I've never seen that before. The A/C drain was in place before I moved into the house.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Similar to a sink, the a/c drain should have a trap. The reasons are a little different..on a sink, it is to block sewer gasses from escaping into the house. WIth the a/c drain, it is to keep from blowing conditioned air out of the house through the open connection.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    Rancher
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    Default Just a guess

    I'm guessing that the condensate pipe goes to a floor drain which would have the P-trap. That's the way mine works.

    Rancher

  6. #6

    Default

    You can put a trap in yrself. They make a bent piece of PVC in that dia that can be coupled in. I'd do it before the humidifier condensate drain. Else you can prob make one out of 4x90's and some leftover pvc pipe.

    My humid drain is tee'd into the ac condensate line too. I just dry coupled it. Each season when I change the filter, I just undo the coupler and inspect. Haven't had to clear it out yet. I agree; it looks neater. Also, you'll likely clog up that clear poly tube over a short pd of time.

    BTW, it looks like PVC - not CPVC. CPVC's yellowish and really for potable water. Reg Sch40PVC will work for the drain.
    Last edited by prashster; 10-23-2006 at 10:52 AM.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default Rancher

    The floor drain P trap is to keep odors out of the AC system. The condensate trap is to keep air in the unit. They are for different purposes, but if the floor drain does not have something else emptying into it, then you could suck sewer gas into the system during the dry months, since both traps will dry out.

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