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Thread: Electrical issues with submersible pump

  1. #1

    Default Electrical issues with submersible pump

    I have a drilled 60' well with a 1/2 hp Model 2445059004 Goulds/Franklin Electric Submersible pump. We suspect we were hit by lightening in August. Was getting shocked in the shower and the lights would dim and it fried my vaccuum cleaner. Had an electrician come out and properly ground out our system. Happened twice since then and only when it rained. Now it's been constant since Wed. and it seems like nothing in house is getting enough power. Electrician came out again yesterday and the voltage at the meter box is good and coming in to the house is good. I have always suspected it had something to do with the well pump because when it kicks on that is when I have issues. Electrician can't figure it out and doesn't seem to think well pump is involved. He is coming back to check line from pole to house. I still say it's the well pump. Any ideas?

  2. #2
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default Check the Neutral

    Could be a bad connection of the neutral to the utility neutral.

    The ground is connected to the neutral at your service and you could be getting a neutral-like connection to ground when measured with an Ohm-meter, but it won't carry enough current.

    The electrician should check the voltage on the neutral line while there is an unbalanced load (all current on one side). If there is significant voltage on the neutral of an outlet when the power is on, then you have a bad neutral connection to the service.

    If it is an open neutral, you should still get good power on 240 Volt loads like the water heater.

  3. #3

    Default Will pass it on!

    Thank you for that input Bob. Will let my electrician know what your thoughts are on that and see if that's already been addressed. Will keep you posted. Yesterday my husband was running power tools in the barn and did not have enough juice to cut wood and when he did try it fried literally two surge protectors in my house. Came home to the whole house smelling like burned plastic. What a stench. Had black soot all over the surge protector my computer was plugged into and on the floor around it. Also a surge protector in bedroom for light, alarm clock/phone. Oddly, it was only the two surge protectors that have a phone line that run through them.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I fully agree with BobNH, I have seen bad neutrals do a lot of funny things to customers equipment. It can also start house fires, so it's nothing to take lightly.

    The power company should be very concerned about this.

    bob...

  5. #5

    Default RE: power co.

    Is the power company responsible for this or am I?

  6. #6
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default

    If it is a bad neutral or other power failure, it depends on where the failure is. If their line has failed (usually up to the point where they connect above your meter, then they own it. If things that you own failed, then you own it.

    If the power company neutral or transformer failed and burned up equipment in your house, then you might be able to make a claim (well documented), but they might not pay it.

  7. #7
    Rancher
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    There should be a ground rod at the power entrance panel (where the electric meter is) even if there was something wrong with the power companies neutral, which is connected to the grounding system on the power poles, or another ground rod at the pad mounted xformer, the ground at the panel should be good enough. So if there is a neutral problem it's the homeowner.

    Rancher

  8. #8
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Default

    The ground rod will usually give ground potential when measured with a voltmeter. However, the ground rod can have high resistance. Some of them are greater than 25 Ohms.

    If the connection to the power company (POCO) transformer neutral is open, the ground rod can't carry enough current to keep the neutral at ground potential. Also, the ground wire to the rod is usually #6, which is marginal for carrying unbalanced current.

    Grounds are often connected to water systems. If the POCO transformer connection is open, you can have appliances at higher than the true ground potential.

  9. #9

    Default No more shocks in the shower!

    Thank you all for your input! It was definitely the neutral connection in the meter box. All better. Electrician installing a new meter box. Temporary fix of jumpering NYSEG's neutral to my neutral til can put new box in! YEAH! The lugs in old meter box are so corroded can't tighten properly to get a good connection, hence the high, low voltage.

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