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Thread: Bleed back question

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  1. #1

    Default Bleed back question

    What would be a maximum distance from house to well casing for a bleedback setup? Also what pitch is necessary for this to function properly?

  2. #2

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    Bleedback for freezing or for charging a standard tank?

    Can't think of a length limit except for the waste of moving the water up and down.

    Length limit applies to tank air charging, you will get too much air.

    More grade the better, no traps and perhaps 1/8" per foot.

  3. #3
    Computer Programmer Bill Arden's Avatar
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    I thought everyone used bladder tanks now days.

    But I would guess that for freezing you would need to maintain the same pitch as sewer line. More imortantly you must keep the pipe straight!

    Smaller pipe tends to have wavy or curved tendancys and thus you may have to tape it to something like a 2x4 before burrying it.

    The only distance limitation would be in how deep you want to dig to maintain pitch.

  4. #4

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    Standard tanks are indeed made and sold in America. Nothing inside to break, and a large standing water charge that greatly reduces freezing issues in medium climates. [Bladder tanks can draw down to near empty and stand there and thus freeze] Dollars per gallon of water stored is much lower than with bladders and standard tanks dont blow masses of gunk into the house as when bladders break. I think they would be better called "Colon tanks" to best reflect what happens when they fail and what enters your pipestream.

    S-it happens and that's what is behind the bladder. I would guess the well guys make more on the bladder tanks and they can handle less bulk and weight on an install for a given drawdown. I use some too, but only if space does not permit.

    If anyone wants one, sears has them at a great price and free delivery to the catalogue stores. They appear to made by AO smith.

  5. #5
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Standard tanks are indeed made and sold in America.

    The next post will probably be along the line that "Homeowners are neither intelligent enough nor diligient enough to manage the air in a standard non-bladder tank."

    The reality is that with proper management of the system, a non-bladder tank can have virtually the same drawdown capacity as a bladder tank of the same physical size.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Phil H2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob NH
    . . . The reality is that with proper management of the system, a non-bladder tank can have virtually the same drawdown capacity as a bladder tank of the same physical size.
    Bob,
    How does that work? I thought the non-bladder tank had zero air pressure when the pump is shut-down and the water is bled. If that is the case, 50% of the tank volume would be consumed when pressurizing from 0 - 15psi (Ideal Gas Law / Boyle's Law). Perhaps, I am mistaken about how non-bladder tanks work.
    Phil
    Last edited by Phil H2; 10-11-2006 at 11:19 AM.

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