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Thread: I need your secret :)

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default I need your secret :)

    In our basement, we see tons of copper pipes below the first floor. However, I would like to know how you guys will introduce a T to an existing/installed copper pipe. I can't visualize how you guys will insert in between the cutted pipe. Should one pipe be moveable to the left or right?

    Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    If you can't spread the pipes enough to insert the T (remember you will need to cut a small section out to account for the T), then you need to cut out a larger section, insert the T, a piece of pipe, a coupling to reconnect to one side of where you cut out the pipe, and then a union on the other end. A union uses sort of a socket and seat where a nut forces the two together.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm sorry, I'm having a hard time deciphering your post. Maybe, a picture will help me a lot.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking slip through coupling

    when you need to install a tee into a copper pipe that

    wont budge either way you simply cut about a 6 inch section out of

    the pipe and install the tee on one end and then cut another piece

    of pipe to make just about a 1/8 of an inch gap left in the line ,

    Then use one "slip through coupling" that will slide all the way

    down onto the pipe, it has no ridge inside it to stop it half way,

    then you line up your pipes flux everything up and slide the

    slip through coupling back over the newley cut section

    to where it is about half way ........

    then you solder the hell out of it and hope that you have drained enough water out of the liens.....


  5. #5

    Default

    Two ways to do this:

    1) cut out about 3/4" - 1" of pipe. Loosen a couple supporting straps. You should have enough 'play' to be able to bend one pipe , slide the tee on, and then jimmyshimmy the other pipe end onto the tee.

    2) Cut out a 1' section of the pipe. Solder the tee to one end of the cut out section. Cut the other end of the end of the cut out section about 1/2 the length of the tee. You want the tee-pipe to almost completely make up the gap between the sections of the main line after you slide the tee back onto one section. Then you use hubless coupler to connect the cutout to the other end of the main line. The hubless doesn't have a ridge in the center. This means you can slide it all the way onto the main line, position your cutout into place and slide the coupler back over the cutout. No jimmyshimmy necessary. The downside of the hubless is that you gotta be careful about sliding the coupler 1/2 way over both sections. The hubbed coupler takes the guesswk out of that part, but some jimmyshimmy will be required.

    IMHO, though, fitting the tee's the easy part. Getting the water out so you can solder is the PITA part
    Last edited by prashster; 09-19-2006 at 07:18 PM.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default

    About the water in the pipe, I learned a lot when I was fixing my friends backyard faucet. We shut off the main line and I told him to flush all the toilets but was wondering why water was still coming out. Was not aware, I told him to open all the faucets in first floor and second floor, shower and so on and guess what happened, water came out on the pipe I cutted. My face got wet and I almost took a bath. LOL.

  7. #7
    Plumber Winslow's Avatar
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    cut out an extra 4" of pipe, the insert the tee and use a slip coupling (a coupling without a stop in the middle). slide the slip coupling entirely over the pipe. After you make up the fittings slide the slip coupling over the existing pipe to complete the joint. Make sure you get the residual water out of the line.

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member v1rtu0s1ty's Avatar
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    Default

    Tell me folks if understood your instructions. Look at the picture below.


  9. #9
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking thats about it

    yes that is about it....

    as long as you can solder real good you should be fine...


    on your diagram I dont see a pipe going out of the tee anywhere....
    its best to solder a nipple and possilby a ball valve shut off to complete the whole process.
    (perhaps that was just an oversite in your drawing)

    again drain down the house as best possible

    stuff the pipes with white bread if necessary to stop the water or it
    will just "majically" come to you....

    because water is natrually attracted to heat and also to

    dumbasses trying to solder for the first time..
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 09-20-2006 at 04:04 AM.

  10. #10

    Default dumbass lessons learned

    Don't repeat the mistakes this dumbass made the 1st time:

    1. Using rye bread or anything with a coarser grain than white to block the water. Learned all about how aerators work, though!
    2. Underestimating the importance of abrasive cleaning and fluxing.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by master plumber mark
    because water is natrually attracted to heat and also to dumbasses trying to solder for the first time..
    Kind of a harsh way to put it, but pretty accurate.

    Dan
    If I remember correctly, my memory is excellent, but my ability to access it is not.

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