(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Blue painters tape??

  1. #16
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,605

    Default

    OK. So, basically what I'm hearing is that my painting experience along 75 cents will get me a cup of coffee and I'm a complete and utter ass for starting a thread like this.

    I have no problem with that. Why don't you just say so.

    Im still not buying any blue tape...LOL

    Well, 75 cents would not get much coffee at Starbucks, and no one is forcing you to buy blue tape. A Ferrari will get you to work just like a Geo will, but some people just prefer to spend their money on something a little, or a lot, better, which is why Ferrari is still in business.

  2. #17
    DIY Senior Member Mike50's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    699

    Default

    Maybe I wasn't clear enough HJ. My opinion changed during the job I finished. That quote is from over a month ago. I started using blue tape for detail trim work.

    Mike50

  3. #18
    Engineer chassis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339

    Default

    I've gotten to the point where I don't mask anymore. I paint the ceiling, then walls, then trim. Don't have to mask the trim from drips or splatter since I will paint it last anyway.

    Past few weeks I've been painting double hung sash mullions by hand with no masking. Looks good if I don't mind saying.

  4. #19
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,984

    Default

    A steady hand, that you must have.

  5. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chassis
    Past few weeks I've been painting double hung sash mullions by hand with no masking. Looks good if I don't mind saying.
    Let's see a pic, Jedi.
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  6. #21
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,685

    Default

    Yeah, and a nice close-up one, too. Although I will admit I've seen real painters who can cut a ceiling line 2 feet at a time that looks terrific -- much better than a masked line of most amateurs. One of them says he's used the same brush for 35 years.

  7. #22
    DIY Senior Member Phil H2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Tujunga, CA
    Posts
    125

    Default

    Masking tape is for sissys LOL
    I am not much of a painter but I can cut in a decent line without tape. I am just slow and could never make a living at it. I think it is easier than masking. But, inside corners are a challange for me. A high quality brush helps immensely. The better the brush, the better it holds/flows the paint at the tip.

    Honestly, I only mask around stuff like carpet. My work isn't perfect. But, I think it looks better than masking. By the way, I have a hard time masking a line. Good tape helps. Mosy of the time I try masking, I give-up and paint without it.

  8. #23
    Engineer chassis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    339

    Default

    OK guys, caveat here - these are exterior sashes and you can't see the munton bars that well from the sidewalk. At least that's my theory. Also, I'm not doing a 100% replacement on the glazing compound, only where it needs it. So a pic would only show you that I've painted a perfect line over bumpy old glazing compound and the previous painter's paint.

    I will declare that I have zero cleanup of paint on the glass panes. Not trying to dodge the challenge, but my point is *my* paint job is great, but the foundation I am painting on isn't the best. I use a 1 1/2" tapered trim brush, and hold it like a pencil. Fairly wet and bend the bristles fairly well. Don't paint with the "feathers" or tips of the bristles. I put the brush against the trim (bent bristles), then let the brush "fall" with gravity, sliding on the paint film. My hand is only guiding the brush as it falls, I'm not pulling or pushing it. This technique is for the vertical bars. Horizontal ones you need to pull the brush, but keep the bristles bent.

    I think the true test, which is highly visible, is the wall-ceiling juncture. I don't think a close up photo is fair because you don't look at the ceiling with your nose bumping into it. Your dinner guests will not climb up on their chairs and inspect the cut-in job on the ceiling. They will simply admire your perfect (in appearance) work from the comfort of the table, sipping their coffee. No flaws will be evident from normal viewing distances. I had a team of pros paint the inside of my house when we moved in, and even they aren't perfect.
    Last edited by chassis; 09-22-2006 at 08:07 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •