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Thread: Clogged Washer Drain - Help!

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  1. #1

    Default Clogged Washer Drain - Help!

    My washer drain (post pipe) overflows when the washer is on the drain cycle, even on small loads. The water spills down onto the floor and causes damage to the nearby 2x4's. I've tried a variety of crystal and liquid drain cleaners, but no luck. I don't have snake equipment.

    Any ideas??

  2. #2
    DIY Member casman's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    The line needs to be snaked out as you already know. I wouldn't run to home depot and buy a snake like I did, everyone told me they can be dangerous but I bought one anyway and almost ripped off my hand, its best left to the pros....

  3. #3
    DIY Member casman's Avatar
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    Almost forgot, don't forget to tell the plumber you put chemicals in the line....

  4. #4

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    If the water overflows soon after the drain cycle, you probably have a lint ball clogging a nearby elbow or tee. New washers flush the lint out with each drain cycle, rather than trapping it in a filter. Buy a small, rotating hand auger. ($25?) Feed the line in the pipe until it stops. Keep the auger end close to the pipe entrance at all times. Lock the line, then rotate it through the bend. Continue this until all the line is extended. Pull it in and out a few times, then remove it. Hopefully, you will have unclogged the line and saved yourself ~$80 bucks.

  5. #5
    Plumber, Contractor, Attorney LonnythePlumber's Avatar
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    Cool Thanks Casman

    Casman, thank you for sharing the dangers of using drain cleaning equipment. It is really not a handyman or diy type of work. It would be rare for a little hand cable to open a 2" line. They often double up on themselves and do not have a big enough head if they even have a head.

  6. #6
    Plumber Deb's Avatar
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    Default Deb

    I second Lonny's advise. A small hand snake is good for nothing. Save your money. And do not use drain cleaners. They do not work (as you found out), they can damage pipes, and they can damage augering equipment and they can damage people. Tell the person that augers this exactly what you have put down the drain. They need to protect themselves and their equipment (if they can), but you will probably have to pay more because you have a line full of caustic chemicals.
    As you have read, there is an art to running that equipment.
    Deb
    The Pipewench

  7. #7

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    I have to disagree. I have opened many a line with just a rotating hand auger.
    Last edited by Terry; 01-06-2005 at 12:10 AM.

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