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Thread: Kinking dryer vent hose

  1. #1
    Dchall_San_Antonio
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    Default Kinking dryer vent hose

    How do you keep the dryer vent hose aligned when pushing the dryer back against the wall? Even when it accidentally gets aligned left to right, it sags in the middle and kinks in the vertical direction.

  2. #2
    DIY Senior Member Pewterpower's Avatar
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    Ya, those are a real PITA. It seems every dryer is different and every builder puts them in the wall in a different direction. Get a duct that is very flexible and don't use more than you have too. It will be alot of experimenting to get the easiest flowing setup. You may need a loop, you may be able to get by with a couple 90* bends, or you might get real lucky and have the duct sqeeze itself down (accordian style) into a perfect staight line.
    Move the dryer back a couple inches at a time and then check the duct.
    I don't know why manufacturers think we all have these huge laundry rooms, that we have enuogh space to leave it pulled away from the wall 2 feet! Everyone I know has their dryer pushed up against the wall as far as they can.

  3. #3
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    You are wasting energy and risking a fire by using corregated vent lines. Make them rigid and your clothes will dry faster and be less likely to catch lint that can catch fire.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member Pewterpower's Avatar
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    ^ Absolutely correct. But in many situations, a permanent, rigid duct is not practical.
    I've often thought about extending the duct out of the wall straight out, with a slightly larger female end. And then puting a duct on the dyer that sticks staight out with a slightly smaller male end.
    Then when you push the dryer back against the wall, the male end lines up with, and then goes into, the female end.

    I'm gonna go have a ciggerette now.

  5. #5
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    I just finished a laundry room, and ran the duct vertically up the plumbing wall and out the gable end of the house. In the laundry room, the 4" duct enters at the top of a chase in the wall, poking out about 4". The chase starts about 40" off the floor and ends just below the height of the dryer outlet. A 3-foot or so length of flexible metal duct connects the in-the-wall duct to a 90 degree adapter, all of which just hangs loose when the dryer is disconnected. The dryer can be run up near the wall, the 90 plugged in to the dryer outlet, and the dryer pushed the rest of the way. I'll post a picture of this tonight.

    There's a commercial product available if you don't want to construct the chase yourself: http://www.dryerbox.com/.

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