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Thread: Hot Water tank - Electric

  1. #16

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    No, Sir.

    I just own a regular V/a/ohm meter.

    Even with the power on I should be able to touch the ends of the elements and see if voltage is there. But that would only tell me if the Thermostat is on and calling for heat. I wouldn't learn much if neither is calling for heat.

    But, is it TRUE that the elements can be removed WITHOUT draining the tank?

    That is what I'd like to learn now.

    Len

  2. #17
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Don't know about removing them without draining, but you can tell if the element is nominally within spec by shutting off power, disconnecting the leads from the element contacts, then using your ohmmeter, check for continuity through the element. Just like a lightbulb, if it is open, it is shot. If you could look up the specs, you might be able to determine the cold resistance value range, but the gross test of is it broken, is easy. My guess is that cold, you might see an ohm or so, but it will look very much like a short. Now, it would be 220*220/2500 = ~97 ohms for a 2500 watt element using 220v once hot, but you can't directly check ohms while hot.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #18
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Turn off the water valve and electricity. Open a faucet, momentarily to relieve the pressure, and then close it again. Remove the wires from the element and have the new one ready for insertion. Have a piece of towel or paper towel handy and unscrew the element. When the element comes out, press the towel into the opening, around the element, to limit the amount of air that can enter the tank. Pull the element out and shove the new one in and tighten it. The whole process can usually be accomplished with only about a half cup of water leaking out.

  4. #19
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The old finger over the top of the straw trick . Neat, I'd not have thought of that. Guess that is one difference between a pro and a DIY'er.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #20

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    Thanks, all.

    I believe I have all the information I need to tackle the job.

    You have been extremely helpful and I appreciate your knowledge and expertise.

    Len

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