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Thread: Floor drain to ejector/effluent pump?

  1. #1

    Question Floor drain to ejector/effluent pump?

    Hello, I have a dry basement that has never had a problem with flooding or moisture. There is currently no floor drain because one was never needed.
    I'm installing an ejector pump and moving the washer/dryer down to the basement as well as putting in a small bathroom. The pump would pump up to my septic tank outlet. I'd like to put in a floor drain to protect against any future problems with the washer/dryer or the water heater leaking. Is it legal in NY to have a floor drain go into the inlet for the ejector basin or are you required by law to have a separate sump pump? I know it's not within code to pump ground water into the septic line but I do not have a sump currently and have never had flooding. I'd like to avoid a separate sump pump (and basin) if it's possible within code. Any advice? Thanks.
    P.S. Obviously I'd have a trap between the floor drain and where it joins the inlet for the ejector pump basin so I don't believe there's any technical issues I'd need to worry about. Just the code issues. I don't see how it's that much different then having a drain in the floor of a shower but I'd appreciate any thoughts you all have.
    Last edited by karsc01; 06-28-2006 at 08:02 AM.

  2. #2

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    You may not get this because it's been awhile, but yes you should be fine adding a floor drain to this system. Floor drains are connected to the sanitary system in my area.

  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    That will work fine, be sure it is traped.

  4. #4

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    Thank you both of you who replied. I did get it . I was told that in addition to the regular trap I might need a trap primer because obviously since it's only for emergencies there wouldn't normally be water going down it. I'm not familiar with these. Do you have them on your drains or know more about them? Thanks again.

  5. #5
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Do a google search on Trap Primer. I know they're common on commercial installations, but for a residential application, I would just pour water down every month or two.

    Jason

  6. #6
    DIY Junior Member
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    Default Similar situation here

    I have a similar situation. I DO have a floor drain that currently empties into an ejector pump. This sump pit is not sealed (the lid doesn't even sit flush as there is 1/2" PVC running under it for AC condensate). This pit handles water from Laundry draining from a laundry sink and Water softener discharge that drains into the laundry sink as well. It also handles AC condensate as mentioned.

    I want to install a full bath in the basement (Shower, toilet, sink). I would like to 'convert' this sump pit into a sewage ejector pit/pump setup. My questions are:

    1. Is it OK to have the floor drain empty into the pit? I believe it is trapped.
    2. What is a recommended sewage ejector pump?
    3. What is the recommended way to break up slab? (saw, jack-hammer, both)

    Note: I do have a second sump pump on the opposite side of the basement that handles groud water that ejects into a pipe draining into my back yard.

    Thanks a lot for any advice.

    -Linc

    (Very informative forum, Thanks!)

  7. #7
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
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    I can offer some advice in response to 3):

    Don't use a dry demolition saw -- the dust this thing generates is unbelievable. Go with a wet diamond saw (my choice) or a jackhammer. No matter what you use, be prepared to make a mess.

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