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Thread: Fixing a wall

  1. #1

    Default Fixing a wall

    Hi, I got a question about fixing a wall. I think they are drywall. I am not sure. But, when the roof leaked it cracked the top covering to the wall. So, I scrapped it off and several layers of paint came off. I wonder, if I did right to fix it. I used spackling. And, I smoothed it on, not really thick, and now it is drying. Please tell me, if this is right?
    Last edited by Cookie; 09-02-2006 at 11:20 PM.

  2. #2

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    There are many different spackling products out there. I use the Dap vinyl spackling paste for most cracks and holes in drywall and just about every other material. It doesn't shrink, it's strong, it's somewhat flexible, and it sands easily. You just need to stir it a little more than the dryer spackles, since it tends to separate when it's sitting on the store shelf.

    As for the ceiling tiles, I would try to clean them first with some kind of degreaser (diluted) and see if that works. If they are stained really bad, you may need to use a stain blocker, like kilz. Stainblockers now come in spray cans that spray upward.

    Eric
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 07-10-2006 at 12:38 PM.

  3. #3
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Verdeboy
    There are many different spackling products out there. I use the Dap vinyl spackling paste for most cracks and holes in drywall and just about every other material. It doesn't shrink, it's strong, it's somewhat flexible, and it sands easily. You just need to stir it a little more than the dryer spackles, since it tends to separate when it's sitting on the store shelf.
    I find it too runny for my tastes. Maybe I'd just rather use too much at one time.

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    The moisture stain will bleed through the spackling. A stainblocking primer (there are various ones out there, as mentioned Kilz is a decent one) will seal that stain in, and allow a nice finish coat.

    The bigger problem is if it was drywall, is that if wet long enough, it will cause the drywall to swell, the paper to bulge, and become soft. If yours is solid, then the primer and then finish coat should work.

    One thing that I used that I found really seems to work is a paint addative made by www.insuladd.com. It is basically mini (like flour) hollow ceramic spheres you mix into paint. It actually makes an insulating radiant barrier, that has surprising properties. It gives the paint a little texture, makes the paint thickness a little greater, and covers minor surface imperfections. The ceramic is the same material that's on the bottom of the space shuttle. Neat stuff. I used it on all the walls on my first floor remodeling, and will be using it on the ceilings of the upstairs when I get around to it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Plaster should be fine with what you've done. The plaster has wood lath behind it (in all likelyhood). When that gets wet, the wood, dirt, etc., will leach out of that and can cause a stain. Once you get it smooth, use the stain blocking primer, then finish.

    You can use that stuff in both interior or exterior walls/ceilings. It just depends on making sure you mix it into the right paint for the job. You need to have a big enough pail to mix it into...it doesn't disolve, it increases the total volume. You can buy paint with it already mixed in, but you aren't buying as much paint per gallon (and thus covereage), since some of it is displaced by the ceramic. Read up on it, and then decide. If the ceiling isn't towards the attic, it probably isn't worth the effort.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911
    I find it too runny for my tastes. Maybe I'd just rather use too much at one time.
    You just have to mix it up good. I just repaired a fifty foot crack in a ceiling with it and it didn't run at all. What bugs me are spackles that get all crumbly.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cookie

    This is a spot about, 2ftx 2ft big. The roof leaked there, and it ran down this wall, I think this is drywall, I am not sure. I wasn't quite sure what to fix it with. I used what I had. Spackling. It is drying now. But, drying a little brown underneath. Why? Do you know? I won't paint this until I fix it right.

    Cookie
    You'll know you fixed it right when, after it is sanded, the area is as smoothe as a baby's behind and blends in with the rest of the wall, with no lines or seams. An exception is if the plaster has a "swirly" texture to it. If it does, you can swirl the taping knife while the spackle is still wet to create this same texture. As I mentioned before, the vinyl spackle paste is wonderful for plaster as well as for drywall repairs. Because it's a paste, you can easily use your taping knife to swirl it, as I just mentioned.

    Don't worry about the brown stain bleeding through. When you're satisfied with the repair, just brush or spray on some kilz, let it dry, and then paint it to match.
    Last edited by Verdeboy; 07-11-2006 at 10:06 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Sleepless in Seattle

    Hey, I'm a sucker for a romantic movie too. But come on, don'tcha just wanna puke at the mere mention of the words "Tom Hanks" and "Meg Ryan" in the same sentence?
    (important note: I'm not a pro)

  9. #9
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Lets back the truck up. Based on what you said, you have sheetrock and the paper layer has peeled off. I do not consider this repairable. Spackling does not bond well to the internal gypsum layer. The brown color you see is most likely staining from the leak problem. You may be able to block this with enough coats of Kilz. But, the proper way to fix this is to cut out all the damaged areas and put up new sheetrock.

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