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Thread: Ataching a basement partition wall

  1. #1
    DIY Member theaggie's Avatar
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    Default Ataching a basement partition wall

    I am in the process of finishing my basement and want to add a partition wall to extend an existing wall along the stairs back to the back wall. We have a walk-out basement and that part of the back wall is above grade so it is conventional wood frame and is finished on the inside with sheet-rock. Where the new wall would join the back wall is between the studs. Also there is a 5" septic pipe at the top ot the back wall that prevents me from both running the top plate all the way to the wall and running the ending stud all the way up to the floor joists.

    Here are my questions:
    1) How do I attach the new wall to the back wall? Do I have to open up the back wall to add blocking?
    2) Is there a standard way to frame around the pipe? My thought is to end the top plate at the last stud, add a jack stud next to it and a stud of the same height at the end with a plate/heater running on top of them.
    3) I would love to be able to hide the septic pipe somehow (like with a cornice) but it has a cleanout that I suspect I need to leave access to.

    A picture of the back wall is attached with a 2x4 laying on the floor where I think the bottom plate will be. Also I've attached a picture of my current framing plan for the new wall.
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    Last edited by theaggie; 01-01-2005 at 12:45 PM.

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Got a digital camera? Post a picture - when entering a reply, scroll down to manage attachments. You have to scale the pic down so the size is (I think) 50K or less, but you may already own s/w that will do that. Helps alot trying to figure out what is going on. And you are right, you want access to the cleanout. You hope you never need it, but when you do, you don't want to tear the wall down to get to it.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3
    DIY Member theaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    Got a digital camera? Post a picture.
    Just Added them to the original post.

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    And you are right, you want access to the cleanout. You hope you never need it, but when you do, you don't want to tear the wall down to get to it.
    The wall shouldn't be an obstruction to the cleanout. My thought to build some sort of removable box around it or to build a fixed soffit with some sort of removable end.

  4. #4

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    From the placement of the screws on the back wall sheetrock, the last stud of the partition wall will not meet a stud of the back wall. You can either remove some sheetrock and add a stud or just leave it as it is and provide support for the wall at the ceiling and floor only. Depends on how strong a wall you want. This isn't a bearing wall, so you could get by with no vertical fastening. Normally you would nail the last stud to the intersecting wall. I have built a long closet to conceal pipes, water meters etc. Allows access and provides storage space. You could also box and conceal the pipes with a small drop ceiling. Use 2 x 3's to frame it with sheetrock on the sides and removable ceiling panel at the bottom. Don't sheetrock over your plumbing as some have done. And if you use a suspended ceiling, photograph the entire area. Makes repairs so much easier in the future.

  5. #5
    DIY Member theaggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob's HandyGuy
    From the placement of the screws on the back wall sheetrock, the last stud of the partition wall will not meet a stud of the back wall.
    Yes you are correct, it misses it by at least 5" in both directions. Opening the wall and adding studs to match the new wall seemed like the "corrrect way" but it also seems like moving backwards as it means breaking open a nice clean floated wall . I was hoping for another magic cure but ... oh well.
    Last edited by theaggie; 01-01-2005 at 04:13 PM.

  6. #6
    DIY Member theaggie's Avatar
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    Smile

    Another options I just thought of which might be a middle ground solution.

    Cut the back wall sheetrock on the right at the point where the new wall hits it in the finished area and on the left at the nearest stud then slide a stud in behind the wall on the right to nail the sheetrock to and another couple of studs to tie to the new wall. I would toe-nail them all in at top and bottom from open side. That way the sheetrock on what will be the finished portion (the right side) of the back wall is undisturbed.

    What do you think?

  7. #7

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    You seem concerned about the stability of the wall at the last 16 inches. A toe-nailed stud is not going to add much to that. I would butt a stud as close to the pipe as possible, attach it to floor and ceiling, then build a little filler piece between it and the ~4" to the back wall. Say a couple 2x4's nailed together. If you can't nail close to the pipe, make a "t" shaped stud then nail that top and bottom. I usually build my partitions on the floor, nailing through the plates into the top of the studs. I then lift the wall, in sections, if necessary, into position. The wall will be solid if you attach the top plate tight to the upper joists and the bottom one tight to the floor. When you add drywall to it, that will add even more strength. (A cheap way to attach the floor plate, is to drill a hole the same diameter and length as a concrete nail. Drop a couple brads into the hole, pointed side up. Pound the concrete nails into the hole. They will grip as good as the fancy anchors and are removable.)

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