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Thread: Replacing Water Service Line

  1. #1

    Default Replacing Water Service Line

    I am about to replace the water service line (galvanized of unknown age) from my meter to my house (approximately 45 feet), and likely more, although I am initially focusing on this area. In addition, I will be adding a main water shut off (currently do not have one besides meter) and replacing an outside faucet.

    I am leaning towards going with CPVC due to cost and ease for me. The problem is, I have 22 units that will be used in the house. For copper, it looks like that would be a 1" pipe, however, for CPVC it looks like I should be going with 1 1/4, which I am fine with. However, I just stopped by a couple of the "big box" hardware stores and only was able to find up to 1". Any suggestions on where I should be looking for 1 1/4 CPVC pipe and fittings? Granted I will be able to step down to smaller diameters once inside, but for the service line at least I think that is what I need. Thanks.

    Brian

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    You should use K copper if the soil is rocky or polly pipe sleeved in 4" corrougated drain pipe. In this area you are required to pig tail out of the house 10' with copper B4 attatching to polly. You also need to check with the water company as some have specific requirements as to what pig tails out of the meter. Who told you to use CPVC.

  3. #3

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    As much as I like copper, I'm leaning away from it due to the galvanized that will still be under the house. If I was doing everything at this point, I would probably consider it (although cost is also a factor in the decision). Your recommendation for Poly might not be a bad idea. I was leaning away from it due to it being softer and more susceptible to cracking and potential issues with the clamp weak points.

    As far as pig-tailing...what if the entire house is CPVC, as I know is the case for many people? From the meter I can see, but the other way? Now if it is serving as the electrical ground, I can see that, but it seems all one would need to do is utilize a new source for grounding, which I would have to do as I move over to CPVC for the remaining plumbing anyways...correct me if I am wrong.

    I chose CPVC because from what I have heard it is superior to poly, not quite as good as copper but pretty close, and priced right.

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    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    More common materials for the underground service would be PVC or black polyethylene. Both are readily available in 1". The advantage of poly is it comes on a roll, so no underground glue joints. PVC is widely used, however, with few problems. You get the idea that most of us on this forum are biased in favor of copper, but the other materials are widely used as well. Check with your local supply house to find out what the most preferred material is in your area. With the price of K copper today at almost unbelievable levels, there is strong motive to choose an alternative material!

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    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Speaking of Poly, I came home yesterday and my 1978 poly service line is leaking.

  6. #6
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Will you use copper to replace it or will you just repair it?

  7. #7

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    Thanks for all the info. One more question (for now). If using poly, do I need to step up the pipe size by 1 like CPVC? (for example, if I need 1" copper, do I need 1 1/4" poly)

    Thanks,

    Brian

  8. #8
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    No, Just find out what size your meter is B4 buying your pipe. 3/4 will probably be fine. Do you know what size the Galv. line is coming in the house now? It should be 3/4" but it could be 1/2".

  9. #9
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    If using poly, I would never go below 1" and would probably use 1 1/4"; 3/4 is just too fragile. You can get it in 100 psi, 160 psi, and other ratings.

    For a lifetime installation with standard use, I would probably use 1" poly in 160 psi grade. If you are going to be a big water user (irrigation, 80 gallon tub to fill, ??) you might select 1 1/4". I suspect that you can get a 100 ft roll at HD.

    The digging will far exceed the cost of the pipe.

  10. #10
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    A 1.25" line on a 5/8 meter over 45' will do nothing a that a 3/4 " line wouldn't do.
    Last edited by Cass; 07-04-2006 at 07:35 PM.

  11. #11
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cass
    A 1.25" line on a 5/8 meter over 45' will do nothing a that a 3/4 " line would do.
    Maybe I'm dumb ... I don't get this, "will do nothing a that a 3/4 " line would do." I'd get water from a 3/4" line...Oh I see, A ''1.25" line on a 5/8 meter over 45'" wouldn't give you any water...

    Seriously, don't get your comment. Wouldn't the small bottle neck at the meter be better than all the headloss with the 45' of pipe?

  12. #12
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    A 5/8" Badger in my catalog is rated for up to 25 GPM maximum, 10 GPM continuous. The 5/8" Master Meter Multi-Jet is rated 20 GPM maximum and 15 GPM continuous. Those are pretty high for a 3/4 poly pipe.

    I have seen too many failed 3/4" poly pipes to trust them for something that needs to last a long time. They are just to fragile. The 160 psi poly in 1" and 1 1/4" will hold up a lot better to trench loads, rough handling, and rocks; and the fittings are a lot more rugged.

  13. #13
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    A 5/8 meter @ 50# Pressure will give X amt. of water per min. wether it is coming out of a 3/4" line or a 1.25" line.

    A larger size line after the meter won't give you more water.

    Out here many areas are putting the PRV in the pit. I always use the 200# PSI polly pipe and sleve it in 4" corragated drain pipe to protect against rocks ,ect..
    Last edited by Cass; 07-04-2006 at 07:49 PM.

  14. #14
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    A larger size line after the meter won't give you more water.
    No, but it won't restrict the water either by friction loss.

    Friction is the major cause of lost volumn, and thus pressure loss.

    Big pipes "are" better.

    With 22 units, you would want a 1" line at the least.

  15. #15
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Terry, or anyone else what would the friction loss difference be over 45' using 1" poly compared to 3/4"?

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