(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: cutting vertical cast iron stack...

  1. #1
    DIY Senior Member coach606's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    144

    Default cutting vertical cast iron stack...

    Just planning here. I will eventually run a 3" drain line to a vertical cast iron stack in the basement. The basement stack has cast iron plumbing above it for a bathroom and the goes through the roof. This plumbing is well supported, but I plan on providing more support before cutting the stack.

    After making sure there is tons of support for any pipes above, I'm going to build a soffit around the C.I. stack and attach riser clamps to it above an below the cut.

    I'll then cut a section of pipe out using snap cutters. My plan is to use a no hub wye fitting 3 x 3 x 3 and fit it into a street 45 to head vertical and pick up the dwv. Or is it better to just use a 3 x 3 x 3 pvc fitting with two no hub adapters?

    Any problems with doing it this way? I know things can go wrong, but I assume that if I properly support all the pipes I can use a no hub fitting to connect pvc to my cast iron.

    Or do I need to consider getting a cast iron wye fitting, pounding in oakum and then sealing over it with liquid lead?

    thanks for the advice.
    Last edited by coach606; 07-02-2006 at 06:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,984

    Default

    Use banded couplings.

  3. #3
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coach606
    Or do I need to consider getting a cast iron wye fitting, pounding in oakum and then sealing over it with liquid lead?
    If I had nothing better to do, I might try this...just to see what it is like. Completely unecssary though.

    If noise is an issue, I would do hubless CI or PVC if it is not.

    Jason

  4. #4
    DIY Senior Member coach606's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    144

    Default noise isn't an issue...

    Noise isn't an issue so I guess I'll just go with the pvc and banded couplers.

    Can anyone explain the hubless cast iron? I'm not sure I understand how it works, unless it just sits on the hub of two banded couplings.

  5. #5
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coach606
    Or do I need to consider getting a cast iron wye fitting, pounding in oakum and then sealing over it with liquid lead?
    A fun job, especially making the molten lead run uphill to seal the lower bell on the wye fitting.

  6. #6
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coach606
    Noise isn't an issue so I guess I'll just go with the pvc and banded couplers.

    Can anyone explain the hubless cast iron? I'm not sure I understand how it works, unless it just sits on the hub of two banded couplings.

    The stainless steel banded rubber/neoprene/whatever couplers are the essentially a two-ended hub. You insert both pieces of pipe into the connector/coupler. (They are just butted up together--one pipe does not enter into the other). After you crank down on the bands, it pulls it alltogether inline and forms a leakproof rigid connection.

    Jason

  7. #7
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey
    A fun job, especially making the molten lead run uphill to seal the lower bell on the wye fitting.
    How do you do that?

  8. #8
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakee911
    How do you do that?
    Ask an old plumber, I guess. I remember watching my father when we built our house back in ought-50, but I don't remember the details. As I recall, there was a rope-like thing wrapped around the lower pipe that allowed you to pour a ring of lead in the general area, then it was tamped upward with a kind of offset chisel-thingy called a caulking iron or packing iron. All the lead does is hold the oakum in place, so it doesn't have to be pretty -- just tight.

  9. #9
    Plumbing Contractor Bud1300's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wetumpka Alabama
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey
    Ask an old plumber, I guess. I remember watching my father when we built our house back in ought-50, but I don't remember the details. As I recall, there was a rope-like thing wrapped around the lower pipe that allowed you to pour a ring of lead in the general area, then it was tamped upward with a kind of offset chisel-thingy called a caulking iron or packing iron. All the lead does is hold the oakum in place, so it doesn't have to be pretty -- just tight.
    You install 1 inch of okum and pack it with a packing iron then you install a joint runner and pour your lead then you us a inside caulking iron then a outside caulking iron to complete the job.

  10. #10
    I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP) Lakee911's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Columbus, OH
    Posts
    1,328

    Default

    Ahh I see. Ok. Thanks.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •