(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: point-of-use water heater

  1. #1

    Default point-of-use water heater

    I have been told that I have a hot water leak in my slab and that instead of digging up the leak, I need to re-route the hot water from the manifold to my kitchen sink. In order to avoid tearing up the walls, I would like to cap off the leaky line and install a point-of-use water heater under the kitchen sink. The heater would service the sink and dishwasher. What I can't determine is if the model I've chosen, the Ariston GL4, will provide enough hot water to do the job. Any advice on choosing an economical electric POU heater that would service both the sink and dishwasher (not simultaneously). Also, any advice on re-routes in general?

    Thanks,
    Margaret

  2. #2
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    3,307

    Default

    The Ariston GL4 is a 4 gallon heater. It should provide enough for the sink but I don't know how many gallons the dishwasher uses. If the dishwasher has a heater (most do) that will make up for the fact that some of the water will be warm. It will probably extend the cycle.

    You should be able to re-route a hot water line using PEX without tearing up too much. I assume that you are in a moderate climate becuase most houses where it is really cold have basements. By running a hot water line to the POU heater, you get instant hot water even with long runs, and the line makes up with hot when it finally gets there.

    You should find the shortest route, probably through the attic and maybe from a nearby bathroom.

    If your existing heater is gas, you will want to use that because of lower fuel charges. If your existing water heater is electric, you might want to just put a 10 gallon heater in the attic or some place near the kitchen, instead of the Ariston, and abandon the hot water line to the kitchen.

    If you have one leak, you should consider that the first of others likely to come. You might want to hold off the re-route until you get another, or plan to re-route both hot and cold now.

  3. #3
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    Bob's advice (it's not the leak, it's the first leak) is well taken. You should probably have a Plan B to reroute all supply plumbing overhead.

    Also, remember that when you "cap off the line", you have to cap it off upstream from the leak, which may not be in an easily accessible location. Just capping it off at the sink won't do. (I know this seems obvious, but I also know of a house where this was done.)

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,633

    Default leak

    Depending on the cause of the leak, it could be the first leak, or it could be the only one they will ever have. I, so far, have only known a couple of homes that had more than one leak in the slab, and the ones they do have are caused by poor installation practices, not bad water.

  5. #5
    Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek Mikey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    2,686

    Default

    I guess it's dependent on location as well. It's very common here, and re-plumbing overhead is commonly advertised in the Yellow Pages (tm). I suspect it's mostly dependent on what was used to fill beneath the slab and how/if the pipes were protected. In my case, I'm told the original owner dredged the lake bottom to get the fill, and the soft tubing was run naked. There are no joints under the slab, supposedly. Now they use clean sand for fill, and either use CPVC or protect the copper with some kind of covering I'm not familiar with.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •