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Thread: Introduction, and a question.

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    May 2006
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    Kentucky
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    Default Introduction, and a question.

    My name is Wyatt and I live in KY. I have recently moved from a very old home to a 10 year old log cabin. I wish I found this site back when I was remodeling my older home's kitchen...but that's all over now.

    However I do have some things, plumbing wise, to do at the new home. I noticed the other day that my "wetlands septic system" needs some immediate attention. It's June, almost, and I would have thought the cattails the previous owner planted would be up and growing. I believe the idea is that water loving plants help my system. There is something else too. My leach field, is well, uh...showing a visible spot (about 30" diameter) of serious gray water., no solids but definitely gray water.

    So anyone here know much about wetlands septic tanks, and the required maintenance procedures?

    Thanks,
    Wyatt
    Last edited by Wyatt; 05-29-2006 at 02:03 PM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't know too much about septic, I'm a city dweller. But, from what you said, I wonder if the previous owner before you, just used it for a mountain home, like weekends and stuff and never even had a perk test done for the leech field. You might want to have one done.
    Anyway, I found this looking around, thought it might be useful for you......
    perrycat

    Perk Test
    When you do not have city sewer you need a septic field. You generally do not install a septic field until your land has passed a perk test by the health department. Do not purchase the land on an old perk test unless you have a written statement from the health department in the county you're purchasing in, that the old perk test is valid. Many times the old perk test is out of date because of new laws and it is then invalid. At which point there would need to be a new perk test done. The normal cost on a perk test is about $150 for the county to do their part and an additional $300 or so to get a proper back hoe to the site for the test. On occasion, a hand auger is sufficient to properly analyze the soil types. Most perk tests are valid for a year only.

    If the property cannot pass a perk test then your next option is to install an engineered field ( if the county allows it). The problem with an engineered field is the cost. If you do not need an engineered field the normal cost is between $3,000 to $4,000. A reasonable rule of thumb to add to this figure if you need to go to an engineered field is $1,000 for each extra foot you have to go down. To spend a total of $20,000 for an engineered field is somewhat common.

    One problem you run across with a septic field is where to put it in relationship to the house location. Make sure your lot is going to be big enough to hold both the size of house you want to build and the septic field also. Just because a certain part of the lot perks does not mean all of the property perks. You have to have a spot perk where you want to put the septic field.

  3. #3
    DIY Junior Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the info PC. But I don't think that's my problem per se. The home is not a vacation home (always been a primary dwelling). There are 8 homes along the road where mine is located. The reason for the the wetlands septic is perhaps due to the karst region of this area and a river below the home. I suppose I could have a perk test done...but I would really like to know if the wetlands part is functioning properly first.

  4. #4
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default septic

    A perc test in a "marsh" is not going to tell you anything, since the ground is already saturated. If the water table rises above the leach lines, the septic will stop working.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks hj. I think I left out an important part of this scenario. This is a constructed wetlands septic. I've found bits and pieces of info around the net. I was just looking for someone who may have some firsthand troubleshooting experience with this particular type of septic system. The area where the leech occured is on the downhill side of the "wetlands field". The grade makes a 4' change in elevation from the wetlands to the place of surface leech.

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