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Thread: Broken threaded PVC

  1. #1

    Default Broken threaded PVC

    I need to remove a broken piece of threaded PVC..

    I don't even know what details to give you to allow you to help me..

    Any advice on how to do this would be appreciated.

    Philip Nelson
    San Antonio, TX

  2. #2
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    Cut it off short, add a coupling, a short piece of pipe and a new fitting on the end.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks for the advice..

    The Female PVC pipe is recessed in Concrete. It's the end of the treaded male piece that cracked off inside..

    Is there some way to grip the inside of the male piece to twist it out?

  4. #4
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    They make a special tool that grips the inside of the pipe to help you then unscrew it. Probably need to go to a plumbing supply house to find it. Might find it in a big box store, never looked, though. Sort of an internal pipe wrench. Don't remember the proper name.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks a bunch for the advice.

    Is it something called an Easy Out or EZ Out? Anyone heard of that tool?

    Thanks again,
    Philip

  6. #6
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Is it a drain pipe or a pressure pipe? The degree of attack depends on whether it needs to seal against water pressure, or if it's just a drain.

    If it is a pressure pipe, then you will need to avoid damaging the threads. Not necessarily a different process but more care.

    You need to slot the inside of the male fitting with a saw or a Dremel tool or some other device. If it is a small pipe (perhaps up to 1 1/2") you can put two slots in it and put a piece of flat metal across it and try to turn it out.

    If the size is such that you can cement in a piece of PVC as an extension you might be able to turn it out. For example, if you took a male adapter of the next size smaller, sand the threads down so it is a snug fit, cement it in, leave it for 24 hours, and then try to turn it out with a pipe wrench. If the cement holds, you are done. If it doesn't hold you are back where you started.

    If neither of the above seem to be workable, then cut at least 3 fairly wide slots, just down to touch the female threads, and try to break it out by working from the outside in with a cold chisel or heavy screwdriver. This will probably work best if it is a large pipe. If you have a heat gun, or even a torch carefully applied, it will be easier if you soften up the male piece.

  7. #7

    Default

    Great advice!!

    Thanks for everything.

    Philip

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