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Thread: Removing Cast Iron Flange Concrete Floor

  1. #1

    Default Removing Cast Iron Flange Concrete Floor

    I have a question regarding my gameplan to remove the cast iron flange. It must have been installed prior to the concrete as the concrete appears to be flush w/ the flange. A plumber recommended chiseling it out and taking out the lead w/ a drill. I started doing this and noticed that this seems to be tons of work. I'm messing up the out base of concrete that supports the flange. Should I continue or try to put a quick ring over the existing? I've taken out about 20% or so of the lead and broken much of the top of the cast iron flange but the more I do it the less it is making sense to me. Any ideas/help is appreciated. I also learned that my shower waste pipe is made of lead and that all I had to do was use a casting iron to make it seal the 2 inch pipe. Learning daily. Thanks, Joe
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  2. #2
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking thats sort fof pretty

    Looks like a christmas decoration.....a wreath or something


    perhaps I am thinking of Saint Pats day....
    the IRISH green,,, you know..


    Just leave it in place and go get one of those OATEY

    expandable PVC flanges that goes down into that 4 inch hole...


    all ya got to do is put it in the hole and use an allen wrench

    and tighten it down into place....

    if it seems too high,
    just take and break off that cast iron flange lip



    they work great and keep me out of lots of combat situations..
    Last edited by master plumber mark; 03-15-2006 at 04:11 PM.

  3. #3

    Default PVC Twist-N-Set Closet Flange

    Master Plumber, thanks for the great advice. I picked up the PVC Twist-N-Set Closet Flange at the big orange box and it looks like I'll have to take off the lip of the top of the pipe. I assume I just whack it w/ a small sledgehammer or the same and a chisel. The expandable flange is just what I was looking for. I guess I'll drill it down into the concrete. Happy St. Pats Day. I'm green w/ envy at all the knowledge you and the experts possess. Thanks again, Joe

  4. #4
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Default

    Before you do this, will there be any kind of floor covering such as vinyl tile put over the concrete? Point is, the flange is supposed to set on top of the finished floor, not recessed. If you are staying with just concrete, then you'll be fine, but if you are adding floor covering, that should go down first.

  5. #5
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Default

    Does the flange you bought have allen set screws to tighten or does it just push into the pipe?

  6. #6
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default flange

    If the Twist-n-Set is like the one I am familiar with, you may need a ten ton jack to get it into the pipe. I know an 8# sledge hammer will not do it.

  7. #7

    Default Twist n set

    Gary, good point. Cass and HJ, there is no allen set screw. I checked the oatey site and couldn't find that one. The twist n set has a rubber gasket w/ threading to tighten the fit. Thanks for the input; let me know if you recommend I get the allen set screw. thanks, Joe

  8. #8

    Default Found It

    I found the oatey w/ three allens screws and I'll probably use it. The flange is going to be sitting about 1/8 above the planned ceramic tile right now as the pipe sticks out about 3/8 inches and the tile is about 1/4. Any ideas on the best way to grind it down or cut it down; my dremel might do the trick. Or should I just grind/cut off the top of the pipe so the pipe is about flush w/ the concrete. Thanks, Joe

  9. #9
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    The magic is to have the bottom of the flange flat on the finished floor. It will normally be higher than the floor. If that 1/8" is a gap under the flange, it might be a problem, though, you may not be able to get the toilet to sit flat over it (probably will, but it won't provide much support unless anchored to the floor).
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  10. #10
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking install it first

    if you have some tile to install,

    what I have found is this oaty flange seems to set a little high
    sometimes....and you might get a sort of rocking effect going
    with it ...if it is a little high..

    you might want to just install this flange directly to the concrete
    floor and tile up to it.....

    that way it wont be too high up

    just use two seals if necessary..


    but either way it should work out ok....

    especially if you caluk down the toilet real
    good when you are through..with the tile...

  11. #11

    Default Oatey too High

    Master Mark, thanks again for the wisdom. So you are saying go w/ the oatey allen wrench flange or just a flange (quick ring) anchored to the concrete? I may cut the cast iron pipe down to make it flush w/ the concrete if that would do. Joe

  12. #12

    Default On second thought

    I wouldn't want the pipe flush w/ the concrete.

    Jim, thanks for your insight as well.

  13. #13
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
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    Talking either way

    either way is going to work

    its all personal preference,

    and for me its always
    better to have a flange just slightly a little low than way too high....

    try the Oatey witht e allen wrench tighteners
    and see what you think

    enough potificateing for now.
    good luck

  14. #14
    Plumber plumber1's Avatar
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    Default c.i. flange

    I would consider cracking that flange with a 3/4" cold chisel. It will crack.

    And pick the lead out with an old screwdriver. reuse the led.

    Get a little oakum and if needed a deeper cast iron flange and lead it in.

  15. #15

    Default Tilted Toilet Waste Pipe

    I took a break from the toilet and I'm back to it. I've determined I have a short sweep? pipe so the oatey twist n set is too long and use of a regular oatey "shorter" plastic flange doesn't give the seal I need. I'd prefer to just use an oatey male flange that I can seal but I can't figure out how to seal the darn thing. The pipe is approx. 4 1/8 in diameter. I started to take the lead out w/ a drill and bit but that is a never ending process. Also, Any ideas how to deal w/ a tilted pipe? It is level front to back but significantly unlevel side to side so ultimately the flange would be unlevel. Thanks to all and your previous response plumber1. Any help much appreciated.

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