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Thread: No Hub couplings

  1. #1

    Default No Hub couplings

    arggggg i just had the entire message typed and then the page dissapeared... lets try this again.

    So the last tim i posted, I was a fresh new homeowner excited to do thigns but not knowing the right way to do them. I have since gotten away from the "this is how I am going to do it" idea, in favor of the "this is how it has to be done" method.

    My basement project is progressing at last (adding a shower to the half bath). I have busted up the concrete underneath where the shower is to go About 2 feet in from the side wall of the townhouse, directly in line with the main drain for the 2nd level bath that runs vertically into the concrete). In doing so, I found lots of surprises.

    This may get confusing, but basically: The main drain is 3" pvc running vertically, meeting a rubber hub, and going into the concrete. It becomes cast iron (i t hink) and appears to make a 90 degree turn to run horizonal toward the center of the house (half a U?) That piece meets a "Y", which is the feed for the basement toilet drain. Then there is about 15" of straight cast iron pipe, running virtually directly under where the shower is to go. From there, it meets a rubber piece that has 2 peices of wood running vertically on either side (i assume to releive some pressure of the dirt/concrete on the rubber?). I did not break the concrete above that, so i don't know any more. If anyone can tell me how to post pictures and draw images on here I'd show you.

    Anyway, here are my questions.

    I intend to hire someone to go from here. I am thinking that I'll have the pipe cut, two no-hub couplings slid over the cast iron sides, place in a pvc "Y" (with the Y pointed upward) and two short pieces of pvc on the ends for the no-hubs to clamp to. Anyone, How much cast iron, roughly, would i need to make this work? As said above, it is 15 inches from the edge of the toilets cast iron "Y" and the rubber piece. The 4 inch pvc "Y" at HD was about 6 inches long and the no-hub couplings were about 4 inches. if my math is right, I'd have to cut about 10" out of the center of the cast iron pipe, leaving a little more than 2 inches on either side.

    Also, something makes me think that it is not code to install the shower at that point in the line (beyond the toilet), even though i am installing a P-trap for the shower.

    Please pardon my improper industry terms. I am new to plumbing but am trying to learn some. Thanks for any/all help.

    Regards,

    Brandon

  2. #2

    Default by the way...

    I did get a plumber to come over a few weeks ago, and he will be coming back again this weekend/next week to do the job. He instructed me to break the concrete around where the main drain meets the concrete, but I think even he didn't expect the main line to run under the shower. I havn't consulted him on the question i posted yet though. Thanks again, Brandon

  3. #3
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    The shower will have a p-trap, then a vent, then it can tie into the main line.

    If you leave off the vent, you can expect the toilet to siphon the trap dry.
    Not a good thing.

    So remember the vent for the shower.

    If a pipe runs under the shower, you may have to either move the line, or move the location of the drain.

    If the pan is tile, then moving the drain is doable.

    When using no hub couplings, and cast iron fittings, the cut is 1/4" more than the fitting.
    If the wye is 6"
    Then the cut is 6-1/4"
    Cast iron fittings will take less space, the plumber will be able to supply them.

  4. #4

    Default thanks!

    Thanks Terry You even answered a question i forgot to ask. as far as the shower pan/drain moving issue, that shouldn't be a problem. I am using one of those cheap, piece together arragements, with the 36x36 plastic-like base. The existing drain line passes across approx. the front 10 inches of the shower, so the typical p-trap configuration should be able to drop, makes its bends, and match right up with the drain line.

    Also, i'll ask him about the cast iron fitting. The guy in the orange smock (or was it blue...?) had said i'd have to rig the pvc "y" with a 4" peice of pvc out of either side for the no-hub to go on. I guess that won't be needed.

    About that vent... can it tie into the vent/vents for the existing basement half-bath drains? Thanks again.

    Rgds,

    Brandon

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default drain

    Why are you asking the questions, and especially listening to guys in orange or blue aprons. If you are having a "real" plumber do the work, he will do it correctly regardless of what you tell him.

  6. #6

    Default real plumber

    Well, the plumber is a plumber by trade, and happens to be a family friend, helping me out. In other words, He's saying get everything ready and he will come and do the "plumber" work (his words). He got frustrated last time he came with my ideas, proposed I completely change how the basement should be done (in a way that made no sense). So, the idea is to educate myself, for my own personal knowledge and so that I can get things ready for when he comes by. I like learning about things whether I complete them or not.

    As for the orange and blue, I know to take what they say with a grain of salt, and obviously I know where to go for the RIGHT answers.

    Speaking of.... thought of something else i meant to ask. The existing drain seems somewhat corse in texture, and has dirt caked on in spots. I'm not sure if and how I should go about cleaning it off and how truely smooth it must be for the no-hub to work.

    Thanks again

    Brandon

  7. #7
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    Whether the pipe is smooth or rough, it will scum up at some point.

    I would snake it while you have the pipe open, but I wouldn't worry too much either.

    The vent for the shower can revent with the other vents, typical is 42" off the floor.
    And like hj said, a plumber can do this stuff in their sleep.
    I can think of better things to dream about, but "Oh Well."

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