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Thread: Pressure tank

  1. #1
    DIY Junior Member Kdog's Avatar
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    Default Pressure tank

    I am building a new house on a shared well and am trying to figure out how to get the water pressure and volume correct. The house is 600 feet from the well, 3/4 hp pump into a pumphouse with a pressure tank (about 5 ft tall), than splits into two lines going to the two houses. I have 600 feet of 1 1/4 pipe going to a shed where I have a hose hooked up for the construction site. When the house is done I will continue the pipe on to the house. Right now, if I turn on the hose,I get a good slug of water for about 30 sec. and then it slows to a trickle. I think I need to install another pressure tank at the house, but how big should I go? Will I need a boost pump? How about a holding tank to get more volume? What is my best options.
    Thanks,
    KD

  2. #2
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    I don't know why you would lose pressure through 600 feet of 1-1/4" pipe. You only lose around 6 psi of pressure at 10 gallons per minute. That is more than you can get through a garden hose.

    You may have a problem at this shared well.

    bob...

  3. #3
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    First need to know a few things:
    1. What is the capacity of the well (gallons per day) in the summer?
    2. What is the capacity of the pump (gallons per minute)? What make/model/flow/pressure capability?
    3. What is the pressure that the pump can deliver at the pump house?
    4. What is the pressure delivered to your house?
    5. How do you share water equitably and responsibly with the other party on the well? You might want to put in water meters at about $60 each.
    6. What are the differences in elevation between the two users? Who is higher and by how much?
    7. How much water do you use? Meter would help determine this.
    a. in peak 10 minutes (will determine size of pressure tank)
    b. in peak one hour (with 2 and 5, will determine if you need a storage tank)
    c. in one day (with 1, 2, and 5, will determine size of storage tank, if needed)

    If you have enough pressure at your house (say 50 psi), and the pump will meet your 10 minute GPM demand, you can probably get by with a large pressure tank at your house.

    If you have sharing problem, your pressure loss could be because your partner on the line has turned on his pump at his house. He could suck the pressure down so you won't get any water. It could also be a safety issue if he has a pump that is creating a vacuum on the pipe. If you put in a pump and he has none, you could suck him dry.

    The best and safest solution to pressure problems would be to install a pump at the pump house that will provide enough pressure for both of you. If you need storage tanks anyway, you will need pumps at the houses, so you may want to keep the existing pump and both use tanks. It will work as long as you don't put a pump on the end of the line from the well.

    With the information listed above, and a little engineering, you can have an equitable system for both. If you each try to pump water out of the system as it is, you will take turns sucking the other dry and risk contamination if there is a leak in the pipe to your house.

  4. #4
    DIY Junior Member Kdog's Avatar
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    Thanks again Bob, Looks like I have some homework to do. I will try to find out all the info needed and check back.
    Thanks,
    KD

  5. #5
    In the Trades Bob NH's Avatar
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    Whatever you find for requirements, the most reliable and economical system for both users will be to locate tanks or booster pumps, if required, at the pump house. You could put a water meter on each line and allocate operating and maintenance costs on the basis of water used.

    If booster pumps are needed and your water partner already has a one, you might add your own so that either one could serve both users. They could be wired to alternate and to run both if there is high demand.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member Mike Swearingen's Avatar
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    Excellent well and pump tutorials:
    www.peekspump.com
    www.jessstryker.com
    Good Luck!
    Mike

  7. #7
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    If this pump was designed to supply two homes, booster pumps should not be required. Besides, with booster pumps you will need a large reservoir to fill so the booster pumps have somewhere to get this extra water from. Now your getting expensive. If the pump in the well won't do the job. Change it to a pump that will. You will only have one pump to maintain and have a lot less expense in the long run.


    bob...

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