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Thread: Sealing leak between rubber and PVC

  1. #1

    Default Sealing leak between rubber and PVC

    Toilet waste pipe PVC is connected to the main line (Cast Iron) with a rubber hub of some kind that has apparently been in place for MANY years.
    I just discovered a TINY leak - one small drop about every 3 minutes coming through the rubber.
    I really dont want to open the whole can of worms of trying to replace this -
    Is there a product that is I could apply around the end of the rubber hub that would adhere to both it and the PVC to seal it?

  2. #2
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Do you really want to patch something like this and just hope it will hold? You have a couple of choices. Replace the connector with a new no hub or call in a plumber to lead in a new cast iron flange. This isn't a place for a bandaid.

  3. #3
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    There should be a large hose clamp around the end that is leaking and there is a nut that you can try and tighten.

    If this doesn't work you will need to replace the peice of rubber or call a plumber to do it.

  4. #4

    Lightbulb

    RE: Gary-
    Don't you just HATE it when people tell you what you already know -- but didn't want to hear/admit.
    Of course you are correct.
    RE: Cass
    Thank you for confirming my hope there was a third option
    (well 4th - but we ruled out my sealant idea.)
    In getting ready to remove the connector I noticed -
    - the rubber was still soft (not dried out)
    - the nuts holding the clamp were little more than hand tight
    - it was set almost a quarter inch back from the PVC edge of the connection.
    SO -
    I loosened both straps and moved the band forward so that the edges for the metal strap were flush with the edges of the rubber --
    Tightened both bands -
    I've run two full tubs of water (tub feeds into this same drain) and the connection is bone dry.
    Gonna lay just enough subfloor to support the toilet - hook it up and see if that pressure makes it leak.
    If not -- I will consider myself home free.

    If anyone sees a fault in this logic PLEASE tell me.
    And thanks to you all for your patience with folks like me.
    AND your wise (even if not always pleasant) advice
    Last edited by PaulHG; 04-04-2006 at 05:30 AM.

  5. #5
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default leak

    You already have a "cobbled" connection because that rubber coupling should not have been used in the first place, so if you try to "patch" it you are just compounding the problem.

  6. #6
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    If your puting down subfloor the flange needs to be replaced, placing the new one on the top of the new finished floor. Don't put the subfloor around the flange.

  7. #7

    Default New Flange

    Yep
    New flange already on hand and waiting to be put on.
    Was surprised at how easy the old one came off --

    Shouldnt it have been solvent sealed?
    In fact - at one point it apparently was -- judging from the purple stain

  8. #8

    Question Waxless Seal/gasket

    Speaking of flange --
    Just a curiosity question on a tangent -
    Do any of you wizards have experience with/opinions on
    "waxless" bowl seals/gaskets

    I saw one by Fluidmaster -- a 2-piece affair that sealed with o-rings to the inside of the flange rather than the top.

    John Stevens Corp markets a simple rubber grommet.

    Seems like a GREAT concept - but I am leary.
    Still planning to use wax ring -- but curious.

  9. #9
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
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    Don't know. All I use are wax rings.

    I still run into some plumbers who use plumbers putty, but for the life of me I don't know where they get the idea that it will work for any length of time.
    Last edited by Cass; 04-04-2006 at 08:00 AM.

  10. #10
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    I have 2 waxless Fluidmasters in my home and have had no problems at all.

  11. #11
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Ihave then on two of my toilets at home...no problems. I used them instead of wax because I was moving things around while remodeling, and needed to pull the toilet a couple of times...didn't want to have to clean wax off.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  12. #12
    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    The PVC fittings and pipe joints should have been solvent welded. You probably got away with it not being glued because it was a snug fit and there's no pressure or standing water to ooze out.

  13. #13

    Default Flange seal failure

    Well - whatever they did
    (unless it has been leaking all along and I didn't know it)
    The old seal was better than the one I just did.

    When I removed the old flange - the surface of the drain rim was rough
    (I assumed from the previous seal)
    I sanded it clean as I could with 100 grit -- then primed and glued the drain and flange let them set - then put toilet on -- flushed it -
    You guessed it - water sprayed under the floor --
    ASSUMING this is from failed seal on new flange.
    Either because I did something wrong - or because the surface was still too rough for a good seal.

    I had replaced the flange with one that slid over the outsid of the pipe because that was what had been there.

    If I can get the replacement off without doing damage to the pipe (any suggestions as to how -- most welcome) I thought I would try a flange that fit and sealed INSIDE the pipe where it is smoother.

    If I can't get the replacement flange off without damaging the pipe rim -
    Can I just square it off -- leaving the base 'band' of the flange around the pipe and install the new flange -- since it will seal INSIDE?

    Have also considered just leaving this flange on - and going with the Fluidmaster 'waxless' bowl seal - that essentially lines the pipe and seals to the inside with o-rings.

    ANY thoughts on any of these ideas -- or suggestions for alternatives - will be most welcome.

    Havent really messed with plumbing in several years -- now I remember why.
    You guys earn every cent you make.

  14. #14

    Default Success

    As of 1am I have a functioning and non-leaking toilet.
    The rubber connector mentioned earlier - the one I retightened between the toilet drain and the main line -- held fine.
    The flange I replaced - for the second time -- held fine.
    Not sure what I did wrong the first time -
    Maybe didn't let the solvent cure or someting .
    This time I let it set for 2 hours before even installing the toilet -
    Seal is fine from all I can tell.
    layed the subfloor panels back down
    If all is still dry Sunday -- will FINALLY be ready to lay floor and tile

    Thanks again for your help and suggestions

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