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Thread: Help! My Pump won't shut off

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member abikerboy's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Gary Slusser]
    Submersible pump motors are rated for continuous duty, meaning they can run constantly for a very long time. If they overheat, the thermal overload turns them off and when the motor cools, they turn on again. That will kill the motor eventually but, those that don't get hot because they are submersed, will run without getting very hot.

    I have wondered about this. Ive had cases, and read postings on here even, stating that if a pump were to run constantly, it would burn out. Ground water is about 55 degrees, and there's a lot of water in a well, and with a motor sitting in that amount of water at that temp, I always wondered about them heating up beyond a certain point.

  2. #17
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    It's often the on/off cycles that doom a pump (and light bulbs!). Not all motors are rated for continuous use, though. You have to read the specs.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  3. #18
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    Jim's right, it's the cycling that kills them. Of coarse the more hours you put on any mechanical device is going to shorten it's life, but the 24/7 is better for one than cycling it every few minutes.

    bob...

  4. #19

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    Submersible pumps are usually multistage impellers and difussers. When they wear, they lose head capacity and cannot put up as much pressure or volume, sounds like you have a worn pump. There is a chance it could be a thread leak in the tubing or plastic in the well. I have had pumps similar to this run for months contunuously!

  5. #20
    Owner of Plumbing Company Windy's Avatar
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    Have run into this issue many times. If it is poly pipe down the well it is probably a galvanized adapter at the pump. A hole rusts through these fittings and the pump then cannot create enough force to feed up. Rarely do I see impellers going before the life of the pump unless sand, dirt or grit have been pumped over the years. 185' is pretty standard up here and unless it is galvanized piping is pretty simple for two to do. If its galvanized replace this with minimum 100psi poly. I use this to at least 220 to 230 then switch to the 200 to 300 psi poly to 400'. Do not replace the galv fitting with galv. Replace with brass. This fitting is barbed well and unless the water is acidic will last forever. If acidic you can also get stainless. Use min two clamps and preferably three on poly and replace torque arrestor. All clamps should be stainless steel gear and all. A good clamp will also last forever and is worth the extra 20 cents. These jobs for me usually run about 100 - 200 dollars Canadian so about $5 American. Just kidding. You can easily test this will a small compressor and a few fitting. You will still need to pull pitless and take pitless section off pipe. With a few fittings you can adapt down to " for compressor connection. 20-30 psi should tell you whether there is a hole or the checkvalve at the pump is failing.

  6. #21
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    Windy, you said 300 psi poly. I didn't know they made it that thick. Is that the highest psi made?

    bob...

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