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Thread: Cycle Stop Valve CSV1Z Results

  1. #1
    DIY Member jluksic's Avatar
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    Default Cycle Stop Valve CSV1Z Results

    I recently installed a Cycle Stop Valve (CSV) model CSV1Z, approximately 1 foot from my pressure switch/pump tank.

    My well delivers ~ 10 GPM, pressure switch is set to 40/60 and State pump tank.

    Results:

    The CSV provides constant pressure at "high" (high = greater than 6 gpm) demand. Running one shower does not "demand" enough water and therefore, the CSV has no effect on house ressure (i.e. the pump will cycle when the pump tank has provided its reserve).

    I installed and configured my CSV to provide ~ 55 psi at ~ 9 gpm, to support my sprinkler system. In this application, it's an excellent product.

  2. #2
    That's all folks! Gary Slusser's Avatar
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    If the 10 gpm is the recovery rate of the well.... it has nothing to do with sizing the CVS. Aren't you supposed to use your peak demand water use gpm?
    Gary Slusser Retired (= out of business)
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  3. #3
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Default Valveman

    Dear jluksic
    If the CSV1Z is holding 55 PSI at 9 GPM, then it will hold a steady 60 PSI for your shower. You just need to turn up your pressure switch to 45/65. the you will also have constant pressure in your shower.
    Valveman

  4. #4
    DIY Member jimmym's Avatar
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    I've got the CSV1 (60PSI). Roughly 52/67 PSI cut in/out. Great pressure. My pump will run continuously as I shower. Usually the most demanding thing I do is fill the tub and the pump holds 60 PSI even if I turn on other things at once. The pump won't push past 60 PSI unless I'm just running the bathroom faucet continuously. How is your pump reaching shutoff pressure if more than 1 GPM is flowing?

  5. #5
    DIY Member jluksic's Avatar
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    Note to all:

    After reading your replies, I realized I had incorrectly "tuned" my CSV1Z. Starting from scratch, I opened the adjusting screw all the way (turned left), created a 2 GPM load and fine tuned my CSV1Z to hold the load at a constant 55 psi.

    Now, my CSV1Z delivers almost perfect performance at any 2 GPM load or above.

    The only other observation is that my CSV1Z holds "constant" pressure only when the pump tank/pump cycle is on the rise... that is if my current house pressure is less than ~55 psi and I open a load greater than 2 GPM, the pressure will decrease until the pressure switch reaches the low set point (40 psi) and "kicks" in the well pump. After the pump starts to cycle (and assuming a greater than 2 GPM continues), the house pressure will increase until settling at a steady at 55 psi (this is the "constant" pressure).

  6. #6
    Moderator valveman's Avatar
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    Default Valveman

    jluksic
    The CSV1Z can't do anything until the pump starts. If you do not like the pressure dropping to 40 PSI before the pump starts you can loosen off all the way on the small screw in the pressure switch. This should get you 12 to 15 pounds between on and off instead of the 20 PSI you have now. In other words your pump will start at 45 or 48 PSI, the CSV1Z will steady the pressure at 55 PSI as long as you are using at least 2 GPM. Just make sure that the pump is still shuting off at about 60 PSI when no water is being used. This is also why some people like a smaller tank because the drop to start up pressure does not take as long. A smaller tank will get you up and going and to the constant pressure quicker but, the larger tank and a wider pressure switch bandwidth gives you more stored water in the tank and keeps the pump from cycling as much for intermident water use such as toilets and ice makers. It is a trade off. But, I have found that the CSV takes off so many cycles for irrigation and other long term water use that we can afford a few more cycles for the house use. So a smaller tank and/or a narrow bandwidth on the pressure switch should not reduce the pump life by much, and gives a more enjoyable constant pressure in the house.

  7. #7
    DIY Member jluksic's Avatar
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    Valveman,
    Your statement below is 100% correct - it's a trade off but bottom line is the CSV1Z works well in our home application. Totally unofficial observation - we seem to be taking longer showers now that pressure is constant - that is, there's no reason to end a shower based on anticipated pressure dropping to the low point.... Strange. When I have the time I'll also adjust the pressure switch to 45psi and adjust the bladder pressure accordingly.

    "It is a trade off. But, I have found that the CSV takes off so many cycles for irrigation and other long term water use that we can afford a few more cycles for the house use. So a smaller tank and/or a narrow bandwidth on the pressure switch should not reduce the pump life by much, and gives a more enjoyable constant pressure in the house."

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