(206) 949-5683, Top Rated Plumber, Seattle
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: sealing roof jack

  1. #1
    DIY Member chetwynd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    39

    Smile sealing roof jack

    Hi,

    The project I'm working on is actually electrical, but the same question applies. I have a piece of galvanized 3/4" pipe going down into a roof jack on a garage. Right now it's sealed with some kind of tar or putty or something that looks like it's been there forever. I need to replace the piece of galvanized pipe, and will then have to reseal where the pipe goes down into the roofjack. What should I use? 20mil tape?

    Talk to me fellas!

    THANKS!

  2. #2
    Master Plumber master plumber mark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    indianapolis indiana - land of the free, home of the brave....
    Posts
    4,243
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default use silicone

    jsut buy a tube of clear silicone

    it works great

  3. #3
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,651

    Default seal

    Or a tube or can of roofing cement.

  4. #4
    Plumber Cass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,984

    Default

    Thoes will do the job.

  5. #5
    DIY Junior Member modbit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    4

    Default

    That will work or roofing bull.

  6. #6
    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA
    Posts
    354

    Default

    Just in case you didn't already know, you should use rigid conduit instead of plumbing pipe for electrical.

    Of course, that has nothing to do with sealing the roof penetration...

  7. #7
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Posts
    25,651

    Default

    The only real difference is that electical conduit has a straight thread, but I do NOT think electrical nipples are any different than plumbing ones.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  8. #8
    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Santa Clara, CA
    Posts
    354

    Default

    Plumbing pipe isn't "approved" for electrical work. Not a big deal, other than an inspector might notice...

  9. #9
    DIY Senior Member kreemoweet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Seattle. WA
    Posts
    371

    Default

    Electrical conduit is deburred, both at the threaded ends and internally. That is most emphatically not the case with the plumbing nipples sold
    most places, which could easily damage wiring pulled thru them. It is a big deal.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •