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Thread: Attach faucet directly to granite counter?

  1. #1

    Default Attach faucet directly to granite counter?

    I have what I'm sure is a basic question, but I haven't been able to find a reference in previous posts.

    My single-hole faucet has become loose underneath my granite counter. Apparently, water has been getting in through the hole the past year and has left the wood underneath (plywood?) rotted and nasty and probably contracted.

    When I mentioned it to a friend that was over, he suggested drilling a hole into the wood about a half inch larger than the faucet. He said that attaching the faucet to the granite was the way to go and that the guy who installed it was probably lazy.

    So are all properly-installed faucets tightened directly to the granite? Are there any things I should watch out for, like over-tightening?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Default

    I prefer mounting the faucets to granite, and not to the wood.

    Wood compresses.

    It would be nice, if whoever is cutting the faucet holes in the granite, also precut the wood a bit bigger for the plumber.

    It's hard to tell someone how tight to put things.

    It's a feel thing.

  3. #3
    Plumber jimbo's Avatar
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    Default

    This is a very common "trouble" area. For some reason, the kitchen design contractor and the granite people like to keep their head in the sand, or some where else I won't mention, and bring in someone at the last minute to install a faucet and have not given any previous consideration to the install issues such as you mentioned.


    The even worse situation is the homeowner who is buying fixtures on his own. He spends a fortune on a nice marble or granite kitchen or lav. Then goes to HD the night before he has someone coming in to install the faucet. He buys one off the shelf, not realizing that he really needed to order a long shank model, with 4 weeks lead time. Then doesn't understand why the plumber can't install his little beauty!

  4. #4
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Jimbo is right,
    You can get the long shank models, or even extensions for some faucets.

    Most extensions arrive in a few days.
    But yes, it's another trip for the plumber, and time for the phone call as well.
    Did I say "TIME"?

    It all adds up.

  5. #5
    DIY Senior Member sulconst2's Avatar
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    Default

    wondering why there would be plywood under granite. if this is a kitchen then the granite should have been installed directly on the cabinets. if you have a blind corner then bracing is used to support the counter. unless this is granite tile?

  6. #6
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer jadnashua's Avatar
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    Default

    It could be 2mm slab or tile...then you might want/need plywood underneath.
    Jim DeBruycker
    Important note - I'm not a pro
    Retired Defense Industry Engineer; Schluter 2.5-day Workshop Completed 2013, 2014

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks Terry for the advice - I will drill a hole then into the wood.

    On a related note, I've narrowed my choice of a new kitchen faucet down to Grohe and Hansgrohe.

    I'm aware of Grohe's sterling reputation, but just how much better - in dollars - is Grohe compared to Hansgrohe. For example, if I'm spending $200 for a Hansgrohe, is a Grohe worth another $100? $200?

    Also, I'm strongly considering buying a faucet off E-b a y. But because the warranties for both companies require a receipt, I don't think I'll be eligible to use it if the need ever comes up. Does anyone have any knowledge regarding the frequency of repair for either brand and the likelihood I'll have to use a warranty in the future?

    Thank you for your help.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jadnashua
    It could be 2mm slab or tile...then you might want/need plywood underneath.
    Not sure of the thickness, but I just thought plywood was needed for a level surface and additional support . Wish I knew better, but kinda clueless when it comes to this stuff.

  9. #9
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Most of the stone I see is laid on plywood.

  10. #10
    General Contractor Carpenter toolaholic's Avatar
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    Default I See More Trouble

    The existing hole gives you no pilot for a hole saw to stay centered on!

    a plywood temp needs to be used to stay centered in the existing hole.

    hope you have the skill to do a clean job. good luck

  11. #11

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    toolaholic,
    You mean I should place another piece of plywood under or over the hole to create a pilot hole?

  12. #12
    General Contractor Carpenter toolaholic's Avatar
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    Default Yes

    you can't secure from the finished top with screws,so underneath is your option, CAREFULLY ,using a narrow peice of plywood,screw it in place through the existing ply. a couple of inches past each side. frim above . carefully drill an 1/8" center hole in the ply. now using a hole saw drill an over size holethrough the template and under counter ply. not easy access
    good luck tool

  13. #13

    Default

    Thanks for the advice Toolaholic...will put it to good use.

  14. #14
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Default hole

    You use one hole saw the size of the existing hole and then fasten it to the saw's mandrel, as a guide, inside the one for the new hole. The mandrel will have the instructions how to do it.

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hj
    You use one hole saw the size of the existing hole and then fasten it to the saw's mandrel, as a guide, inside the one for the new hole. The mandrel will have the instructions how to do it.
    I don't understand this statement - I put the smaller saw inside the larger one, or the hole? Could you clarify please?

    And anyone with an opinion in regards to Grohe faucets and frequency of repairs?

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