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Thread: Drain Embedded in Concrete Slab in Condo Complex

  1. #16
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    It was an awesome drawing.
    It does not show the proper venting. There should be a vent stack, and a waste stack. The tub arm vents "before" entering the waste stack. You're allowed five feet on a 2" trap arm before the vent.

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Thanks for the picture Terry! This is exactly what I wanted to see. I'm gaining hope that my floor isn't post-tension as originally thought. And I just found a small hint that there might be a wood surface only 1" below the concrete, similar to what your photo showed.

    I moved some of the insulation out of the way and found a wood floor underneath an incomplete concrete pour. So this might be what I was hoping for. Do you guys think that the concrete pour is above a wood subfloor with this picture?
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  3. #18
    Forum Admin, Expert Plumber Terry's Avatar
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    Some apartments are wood framed with "light weight" concrete poured over the plywood floors. This is a 1.5" pour. We block around the toilet (closet flange) and normally a 2x4 flat for the tub apron to set on.

  4. #19
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    Some apartments are wood framed with "light weight" concrete poured over the plywood floors. This is a 1.5" pour. We block around the toilet (closet flange) and normally a 2x4 flat for the tub apron to set on.
    Terry, how hard is this to demolish? Does it require a jackhammer since it's only a 1.5" pour?

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    Some apartments are wood framed with "light weight" concrete poured over the plywood floors. This is a 1.5" pour. We block around the toilet (closet flange) and normally a 2x4 flat for the tub apron to set on.
    Oh and would you recommend this to be done when the new shower or tub gets put in too? If so, is it just a simple or of concrete for the tub or shower to situate on?

    Thanks a bunch Terry!

  6. #21
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Update if you're interested. We demolished the concrete base. The exposed wood subfloor in the previous photos were key in figuring out that the concrete was only about 1.5 inches thick (and therefore, not post-stressed.
    Using a hammer drill and roto-hammer, we drilled a few holes and used a pick hammer + sledge to break it up by hand. Pretty easy. Ended up uncovering the wood subfloor and the access hole to the drain, as Terry's previous photo showed.

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  7. #22
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Story continues: the drain still needed to be switched to a 2" for a shower. The vent pipe was inside the wall about 1.5 feet so we couldn't access it from the bathroom. We had to go to the other side and open a hole in the floor in the closet to get to the pipe union. Still not able to reach it, we called a plumber who switched it out for us (he was nimble enough to get his arms in there and change it out).

    Here are the holes dug into the closet on the other side of the wall. You can see that since the condo's framing is metal, there are access-holes to reach the piping. Not the most conveniently placed, but placed well-enough to get a professional plumber's arms through.
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  8. #23
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    And for $650 he got the pipe switched out from a 1.5" to a 2" and it only took him and his buddy an hour. I probably could've shopped around for someone a little cheaper (since all the demolition work was already done) but the previous guy quoted us $1400. So $650 sounded incredibly reasonable by comparison. Now we can patch that hole and finally start pre-sloping.
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  9. #24
    ACO Shower Drain Sales johnfrwhipple's Avatar
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    That concrete is a fire separator and surely required for your local code. Make sure you document the fix.


    jfrwhipple@gmail.com - www-no-curb.com - 604 506 6792

    Always get construction advice double checked by your local city hall. Flood Test Every Shower - Every Time.

  10. #25
    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    quote;The entire floor shakes when one lets loose.

    IT also shakes when one is hit by a concrete hole saw, even if it does not "let loose". I would be interested in HOW he changed from 1 1/2" to 2" in an hour, (especially since the 1 1/2" was a copper drain), unless the branch line was already 2". Slopewise, it is usually NOT a good idea to put the drain at one end of the shower stall, because it makes a very steep angle to go from the drain up to the "floor level" in that short a space.
    Last edited by hj; 03-17-2014 at 08:08 AM.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

  11. #26
    DIY Junior Member jdsilver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    quote;The entire floor shakes when one lets loose.

    IT also shakes when one is hit by a concrete hole saw, even if it does not "let loose". I would be interested in HOW he changed from 1 1/2" to 2" in an hour, (especially since the 1 1/2" was a copper drain), unless the branch line was already 2". Slopewise, it is usually NOT a good idea to put the drain at one end of the shower stall, because it makes a very steep angle to go from the drain up to the "floor level" in that short a space.

    Ah yes, I didn't mention it above but the branch line was 2" at the vent pipe union. The hard part was reaching that union since it was about a foot into the wall and blocked by a bunch of metal framing. He merely had to switch the 1'5" pipe out to 2" at the vent pipe. Reaching it while not being able to see anything was the hard part.

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