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Thread: Can PRV adjust to 0 psig?

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    DIY Junior Member droptail's Avatar
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    Default Can PRV adjust to 0 psig?

    Can I temporarily adjust my Zurn Wilkins 600 pressure reducing water valve for no house water pressure?

    Thanks
    Last edited by droptail; 01-26-2014 at 06:38 PM.

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    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
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    Most PRV's go from 25-75 psi and come set at 50 psi. 0 psi would be shut off, not what a PRV is designed for.

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    DIY Junior Member droptail's Avatar
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    Its unclear if you have answered my question.
    I know what they are designed for.
    I am asking if it is physically possible to remove the adjustment screw and get zero flow.

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    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
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    No, the lowest it will go is 25 psi. You use a shut off valve to do what you want.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    Common sense should tell you that you should have a shut off valve where the water supply enters the house. Preferable a 1/4 turn ball valve. You never know when you could have a broken pipe and need to shut the water off quickly.

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by droptail View Post
    Can I temporarily adjust my Zurn Wilkins 600 pressure reducing water valve for no house water pressure?

    Thanks

    Some PRVs can go down to 0 , but as stated that Model should not.

    You should have a shut off at your meter, And some Big Box stores have the tool that fits the valve. Or you can call the water company.


    Good Luck.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    Moderator & Master Plumber hj's Avatar
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    Normally, if something, such as corrosion, destroys the spring compression of the adjuster, the system pressure WILL drop to zero. If yours will, then just remove the adjusting bolt. The answer to your question should be intuitive.
    Licensed residential and commercial plumber

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hj View Post
    Normally, if something, such as corrosion, destroys the spring compression of the adjuster, the system pressure WILL drop to zero. If yours will, then just remove the adjusting bolt. The answer to your question should be intuitive.

    I can see if the spring is broke then the water would be shut Off.

    But a Good Spring will hit the top of the housing, even if the screw is removed.

    If it was mine, I would just try it, but I have 2 water shut off locations, so really no need.

    I can say I have never owned that model. If I had one I would test it to see if the Manufacture tells the truth in their spec sheet.


    Try it just for Grins, Then report back about how everyone and the manufacture is wrong.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    DIY Junior Member droptail's Avatar
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    Thank you for your responses.

    The handle for my shut off had rusted and broke off, so that wasn't an option until I loosened up the ball valve.

    It seems to me now after my investigation that its probable the spring is always minimally compressed enough to hold spring assy in place if the screw is removed, hence the minimum operating pressure of this design.
    It didn't feel like there was any spring press when installing the screw housing, but the old spring may be slightly collapsed/fatigued.
    I can't say for sure until I extract the broken screw, or replace unit.

    Not such a great design to allow the stem washer wear to put the house in supply line (high) pressure without ever knowing it.

    I will try and remember and report back.

    Thanks again.

  10. #10
    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by droptail View Post
    It seems to me now after my investigation that its probable the spring is always minimally compressed enough to hold spring assy in place if the screw is removed, hence the minimum operating pressure of this design.
    That is what I was thinking, and your are correct.

    Good Luck on your project.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    In the Trades Gary Swart's Avatar
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    My suggestion on the shut off valve is of course in addition to the meter shut off. In my city, they "discourage" homeowners having a key to shut the water off at the meter. I have one anyway, but I still have a quarter turn ball valve in my basement where the supply line enters the house. If I have trouble in the middle of winter or late at night, I don't relish the idea of going out the street and digging the snow off the meter's manhole. If I have a problem with the supply line, then the meter shut off is necessary. Just a suggestion, but for next to nothing, why not?

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    Jack of all trades DonL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Swart View Post
    My suggestion on the shut off valve is of course in addition to the meter shut off. In my city, they "discourage" homeowners having a key to shut the water off at the meter. I have one anyway, but I still have a quarter turn ball valve in my basement where the supply line enters the house. If I have trouble in the middle of winter or late at night, I don't relish the idea of going out the street and digging the snow off the meter's manhole. If I have a problem with the supply line, then the meter shut off is necessary. Just a suggestion, but for next to nothing, why not?

    Not sure why the city would frown or discourage a homeowner having the tool to shut it off.

    If they shut you off for not paying the bill, and you turn it back on, then they will know it. The meter will read usage.

    If you do not pay your water bill they will shut it off for you, no need to have a tool.


    I am lucky so far, I would not want to live in the city limits.
    Theory only works perfect in a vacuum.

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    In the Trades Jerome2877's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonL View Post
    Not sure why the city would frown or discourage a homeowner having the tool to shut it off.

    If they shut you off for not paying the bill, and you turn it back on, then they will know it. The meter will read usage.

    If you do not pay your water bill they will shut it off for you, no need to have a tool.


    I am lucky so far, I would not want to live in the city limits.
    Its a liability thing, if you break the valve then your responsible.

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    DIY Senior Member bluebinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome2877 View Post
    Its a liability thing, if you break the valve then your responsible.
    The local water guys here want to be around if something breaks. Especially this year since it's rained maybe an inch since last May.

    They do prefer you have a tool in case of an earthquake or whatever.

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    Master Plumber Caduceus's Avatar
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    Funny, I started reading this thread and had to reply before finishing cause I got a good chuckle. PRVs don't go to 0. Otherwise it's just called a 'valve' for this application and the 'PR' can be removed from the equation.

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