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Thread: Waterlogged galvanized tank, 45 PSI on the guage, no water at the drain

  1. #16
    DIY Senior Member craigpump's Avatar
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    Replace those old galvanized fittings before they rot through and create a leak

  2. #17
    DIY Junior Member bruceha2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by valveman View Post
    An Air Volume Control about 1/2 way up the tank (with the gauge screwed into it), lets any excess air out.
    Looks like something I'll need to buy. All I have on the side of the tank (and it is about half way up) is a short galvanized nipple and 90 fitting that the gauge is screwed into. I assume the air volume control opens at some pressure above the tank pressure switch (50 PSI on mine)? Otherwise, there would be no way to get air pressure into the tank after draining but prior to turning the pump back on.

    Bruce

  3. #18
    DIY Junior Member bruceha2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by craigpump View Post
    Replace those old galvanized fittings before they rot through and create a leak
    OKaaaayyy .... With new galvanized? I guess if I need to replace the piece with the check valve, doing the other pieces at the same time wouldn't be too much work. Unless they all decide that even PB Blaster isn't strong enough to loosen things up which would fit my general luck of late.

    You may be able to see that the pump side pipe comes in from the left, turns a 90 toward where I took the picture, then 90 back to the left to the union, check valve fitting, shutoff, tank. Is there any reason it should be done that way? I ask because the tank is sitting on what I would generously call a "slap it together" support system. The house is built on ledge and the floor isn't close to flat where the tank sits. If I replace the pipe, I might as well move the tank "forward" (relative to the picture) a couple of feet where I can make a raised level surface to support it and turn it 90 degrees to remove that "U" (assuming there is no reason to have it and *I* can't think of one). Is there any "desired" distance from where the pipe from the well comes in and the tank or any reason it can't be a straight piece of pipe to the union and then the check valve fitting? I'll try to get a picture of the current setup tomorrow. You guys will gasp in horror

    I think I'll do it in the spring when it isn't so cold in the basement. Moving the tank a couple of feet to put it on secure footing won't mean messing with pipe I don't already want to deal with anyway because the pipe going to the fixtures from the tank starts as copper but has a cob job of connections going to:
    - the domestic supply (copper, then all new PEX)
    - black plastic to an outside faucet
    - a shutoff and drain which is connected to black plastic pipe going underground to the barn.

    All 3 valves related to the black plastic pipe are gates and in bad shape. It is a mess I want to clean up.

    Bruce

  4. #19
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    There are two kinds of AVCs. One that lets air out and the other that lets air in. The kind that lets air out work in conjunction with a bleeder/snifter/check. The kind that lets air in has a line that goes to the pump.

  5. #20
    DIY Junior Member bruceha2000's Avatar
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    OK, here it is. Quite the "unique" support design, no? Yes, the big gray blob in the front right is ledge. Whoever poured the concrete floor chose a level and let 'er rip, the rocks that stick up, well they stick up. The largest part is about 3 times higher than this part. I can hear the people who originally dug the foundation probably 150 years ago.

    "Should we break up that huge chunk of rock so the basement floor is flatter? Only take a couple of weeks."
    "Nope."

    I could easily turn the tank 90 degrees and move it to about where the plastic bin is under the drain cock. I really can't imagine why someone would go to all the trouble with the bricks and angle iron rather than just put it on a relatively flat surface nearby and shim a LITTLE.

    I also noted that the fitting for the gauge is about 2/3 up, not half. Would an AVC go there or is that too high?

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  6. #21
    DIYer, not in the trades LLigetfa's Avatar
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    Tanks that I've seen with an AVC had I think about a 2" bung, I think to have room for the float to fit through. I think there are other styles with a diaphragm but have no experience with those. I think maybe they don't use a float but rather sense the heavier pressure of the water versus air.

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